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Dennis_D
Pit Crew

1965 Thunderbird Convertible

Hello All,

 

I just purchased a nice looking 1965 Ford Thunderbird Convertible.  The top system is working as it should currently.  Just to be ready for things in the future I am wondering if there is an acknowledged expert or experts who know how to work on these cars the right way.  I know there is a fellow by the name of John Chapman that is considered the expert on the 1961-1967 Lincoln Convertibles.  I'm hoping there is a name or two for the Thunderbirds, too.  I'm trying to be ready for any future issues.

 

Any help would be appreciated.  Thank you.  Keep Smilin',

Dennis D

8 REPLIES 8
Sajeev
Community Manager

Congrats on the purchase!  The expert you mentioned is actually John Cashman (https://convertiblelincolns.com/) and honestly I would ask him for a referral for Thunderbird specific issues.  From what I have seen, he pretty much corners the market on these cars!

Dennis_D
Pit Crew

Thanks, I had already talked with John and he told me that he doesn't work on Thunderbirds because there are enough different parts between the Lincolns and Thunderbirds to make it prohibitive to carry that kind of inventory around with him as he travels to repairs.  He didn't know of anyone that travels to repairs like he does.

Sajeev
Community Manager

That's good to know, I'd recommend asking nearby auto trim shops (that also install convertible tops) to see if they know someone who repairs power tops. If all else fails, you might have to buy the vintage Ford service manuals and learn it yourself. Hate to say that, but that's exactly why I started working on my cars: nobody else would do it! 

Dennis_D
Pit Crew

Thanks, Sajeev.  Going back to school?  Really?  Oh my.  Well, if it has to be done, it has to be done.  We'll see what kind of teacher those manuals can be.  It just might depend a lot on the student.

Keep Smilin',

Dennis

spoom
Technician

First thing to do even if you DO find someone is to procure the shop, body, parts, etc. manuals for your car. They will more than pay for themselves down the road the first time you need help from a good mechanic who DOESN'T specialize in your car. On any trip that's longer than I car to push a classic car, toss the books (in their ziplock bags) into the trunk or under a seat!
Guitar74
Technician

Agreed. I have a FSM for every classic I own as well as the factory electrical manuals. The electrical diagrams for my '68 Cougar more than paid for themselves when I was diagnosing my sequential turn signals. 

 

There are no real shops thst I would trust my classics to in Metro Atlanta. Besides, I can do a better job myself. 

 

I say make yourself the expert. 

Dennis_D
Pit Crew

Thanks to Guitar74 and Spoom for the input.  As it turns out the seller included a few manuals with the car.  Looks like I have some bedtime reading to do.  Thank you.

Dennis_D
Pit Crew

Hello All,

 

I just purchased a nice looking 1965 Ford Thunderbird Convertible.  The top system is working as it should currently.  Just to be ready for things in the future I am wondering if there is an acknowledged expert or experts who know how to work on these cars the right way.  I know there is a fellow by the name of John Chapman that is considered the expert on the 1961-1967 Lincoln Convertibles.  I'm hoping there is a name or two for the Thunderbirds, too.  I'm trying to be ready for any future issues.

 

Any help would be appreciated.  Thank you.  Keep Smilin',

Dennis D