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Sajeev
Community Manager

Community Question: Ever disassembled a brand new part?

While I have re-clocked an alternator case, I have never disassembled a brand new part.  But here I am taking tin snips to a brand new brake line. These things are designed quite well, it's fascinating to see the multi layers of rubber...which begs the question: How on earth is this assembled at the rubber hose factory?   

 

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ANNNNND...in case you were wondering, the photo below is why i cut this hose apart.  Yes, I got a full refund, promptly, from RockAuto (which was nice of them!). 

 

 

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21 REPLIES 21
NITRO450EXP
Instructor

Could have probably saved the threads with careful die chasing, depending on how deep the female mating hole was and how many threads were engaged when full inserted, but I would not have used it, Brakes are kind of important.

 

Thanks for the show and tell.

 

Nitro

Sajeev
Community Manager

Yeah I considered it, but new lines are about $10 each for this car (85 Thunderbird).  Not worth the effort, especially for a safety feature. 

Rob1
Instructor

Yes Sajeev I have had alternators/master cyl/starters apart new out of the box unfortunately the nearest auto store is 100 mile rounder living in a reasonably remote area so sometimes a non working new part is a simple fix I try first,with that said years ago when the majority of the replacement parts were built/rebuilt in the good ole USA or Canada it was rare to get a part that didn't work as expected and have a great life expectancy  sadly today not the case.Cheers R

Sajeev
Community Manager

Wow, you know, I am lucky to live next to an Autozone hub that's literally 0.2 miles away from me. Not that I get all my parts from Autozone, but that's a topic for another thread. 

 

I've had better luck with local rebuilders for parts like Alternators, but if you know what you're doing, having an alternator with a lifetime warranty really comes in handy when you are stranded in another town and the parts store will gladly take your failed part, get you a new one, and you can be on your way. 

Rob1
Instructor

Most times I order online and have parts delivered may cost a bit more but better then the drive,LOL if I lived next to a auto zone there would be a well worn path.R

TeutonicScot
Intermediate Driver

So much aftermarket stuff nowadays is just plain junk. I try to be very selective about where parts are made for my vehicles now. It's extremely frustrating to order stuff online and then have to wait for it and pay for all the shipping, only to get it and have it not fit or be unusable for whatever reason, (usually poorly manufactured or engineered) meanwhile your car languishes in the garage.... 

hyperv6
Instructor

What I find funny is companies like Auto Zone and other national chains will buy parts from web parts companies and resell them to walk in customers at a mark up. 

Shop carefully. They may just be ordering you a web part for you. 

Sajeev
Community Manager

I bet they were, as I have a feeling they all use the same warehouses for parts that won't normally fly off their shelves.  That said, when this part turned out to be a dud, I couldn't wait for RockAuto to ship me a new one so I ordered it from Autozone and got it the next day.  At least the rest of my brake job/restoration was affordable thanks to RA. 

Charger727
New Driver

I always take apart new carburetors - just to make sure floats are set correctly and all parts present.  My last specialty built Holley carb had a missing power-valve.  That would have massively flooded the engine at start up and could have caused some really serious issues!!!

Sajeev
Community Manager

That's a really good point!  It's sometimes hard to trust a rebuilt carb, you gotta make sure everything was done correctly! 

TonyT
Advanced Driver

We always disassemble and deburr oil pumps for our engine builds, and lately have found it necessary to crack open the solenoid on a well-known brand of gear reduction starters to ensure that the energize wire is correctly attached (three out of the last five were loose.) And we have had to recheck the workmanship of another brands distributors as well, after a no-start condition made us go nuts trying to find the cause, which was the pins in the two-wire connector  becoming unseated when it was snapped together. Ah, the rewards of working on cars...

Billd66
New Driver

Having spent my entire career in manufacturing including 10 years with a major automobile manufacturer and 10 years as an tier 1 automotive supplier to almost every major automotive company, I can tell you from personal experience there is a multitude of both competent and and incompetent parts suppliers. With huge pressures on reducing costs, especially for aftermarket parts, companies sometimes are sourcing parts with too much pressure on low cost and not enough on quality.  It is buyer beware. Quality is not free, there is a cost.  it begins with ethical companies who have systems, controls and people in place to insure products meet the expectations of their designed use. Sometimes sourcing parts world wide suppliers has its consequences.

Pilott
Pit Crew

Not trying to hyjack your responses here, Sajeev but here is a related question to pose to the Community.  I have a number of collector cars and also a couple of daily drivers that I do repair work on myself. In the last 10 years I have had to replace a number of Alternators.  Typically I try a rebuilt because of availability & much lower cost.  In nearly every instance the first one (or 2) either will not work out of the box or only last about 300 miles.  I have personally talked to lots of others who have had the same experience.  It seems the rebuilders don't even test them ... they leave that up to the customer ... talk about lack of quality assurance!  In a few instances I have resorted to the much more expensive "new" option ... which seems somewhat more likely to get you a better quality unit.   I would be very interested in a reader "poll" on this subject.  Alternators in particular seem to be a "worst case" for aftermarket lack of quality assurance.  

Sajeev
Community Manager

@Pilott I feel you pain, as rebuilt alternators are generally a crapshoot. You can lower the chances of problems by getting a local alternator/starter repair shop to rebuild yours, as they normally test the alternator before delivering it to you AND they are likely to do a better job because they aren't a faceless company (i.e. local businesses have more accountability).  

husker_boxster
New Driver

I'm resurrecting an 87 928 S4.  The fwd-back button on both power seats was broken off.  The stub still worked but wouldn't move the seats far enough fwd to get to the rear bolts to remove the seats.  In a bit of a pickle, so I examine the new $80 replacement.  It appears I can remove the switch from the case, which would allow me to snap the new switch into the existing case.  Carefully got the switch removed from the new case and put into the existing case in the seat.  It worked!

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Sajeev
Community Manager

Brilliant work @husker_boxster I love seeing this kind of ingenuity, especially on a Porsche product! 

wentwest
Pit Crew

 

I've bought new, cheap carburetors for old motorcycles, knowing they were pretty much crap but that they might contain useable parts.  When they show up I take the old carb and the new carb apart and use the better parts to build the replacement.  The castings of old carbs are fine, it's the valves and moving parts that deteriorate.  

oldcars
Intermediate Driver

So this brake hose would not have been made like this. You can tell from the picture someone has cross threaded during installation. Have seen before where a purchaser does this , reboxes the item and sends it back. Then the next purchaser gets it .

Owning a repair shop some 35 years ago we found remanufactured parts even then were low quality from some suppliers. Master cylinders, alternators, water pumps, clutches, to name a few.

If time allows this is what i do. We have a few competent rebuilders in our area that I use for alternators, starters and water pumps . Otherwise buy new.

Carburetors are complicated and sophisticated. Never buy one that is remanufactured (assembly line low quality). There are some specialty shops that do a great job rebuilding carburetors. 

I actually spend my days restoring old carburetors now (retirement hobby) and have opened up a few remanufactured carbs to find things far from correct. Quadrajet and Holley carbs are my specialty which I enjoy.

 

Sajeev
Community Manager

@oldcars I was hoping someone would mention this!  I know you are right, this didn't look like a manufacturing defect, rather a fraudulent return that went back into warehouse stock when it shoulda been discarded.  

Tinkerah
Instructor

Having some experience in manufacturing and machining it appears clear to me as well. While chasing or simply grinding away the damaged threads (rule of thumb in the field is thread engagement equal to or greater than the diameter is stronger than the fastener material - so the fastener will break before the threads strip, especially a hollow one) would have worked; you paid for new and deserve to receive new.

Sajeev
Community Manager

Actually I wouldn't be surprised if I bought that from Rock Auto's discounted/clearance section, but still this is the first time I have had a problem with a damaged part coming back into stock.