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Community Manager

Community Question: Cars with equal parts Pleasure and Pain?

No I'm not talking about a Mustang or a Chevy Truck that was particularly difficult to restore.  This post is for everyone who's owned a car made of unobtainum technology, for cars of limited production and/or limited appeal (i.e. they are all crushed by now, probably for good reason) and for cars that are extremely difficult to diagnose/repair. 

 

Here's mine: 1989 Lincoln Continental Signature Series.  The last owner actually paid my local mechanic to rebuild the awful transmission, replace the head gaskets + deck the block/heads, convert the air suspension to coils...so I paid $900 for it and "invested" over 10 times more to make it where it is today. I love the stupid Taurus-Continental, can't stop driving it. 

 

At least it wins awards for being the nuttiest thing in a car show. 😂

 

There's no need to be as insane as me, but tell us what car you'd own if you had the love, the motivation, and most importantly the 💰💰💰to keep it running. 

 

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45 REPLIES 45
Pit Crew

I know what you mean. I’ve owned a Dodge Stealth, which is very similar, and I start having problem getting parts for it, before Mitsubishi arrived in Canada. I was hoping sourcing parts from them. I did loved that car; it had pop up headlights, had a removable roof that stored in the trunk. And it was very fast, even if it wasn’t an awd turbo.

Community Manager

Stealths definitely fit the bill.  I bet exterior parts are harder to find than the Mitsubishi, just because there are less Dodges on the globe than there are 3000 GTs/GTOs. 

Instructor

I swear Sajeev is pitching underhand to get me in trouble. 50/50 balance of Pleasure and Pain? My '67 Country Sedan 289 cu wagon at a drive-in movie. But only if it was a really good movie.

Community Manager

I'd like to think that Hagerty hired me for my ability to get people into such types of trouble.  

Instructor

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 understood 😉

Technician

My '68 Cougar. It is fund to drive but there are a few things that will drive you nuts with the 1st gen sister of the Mustang. First is when the sequential tail lights start going bad. Although, they will let you know with how many "wheezes" you get when they are on. After disassembling everything, cleaning contacts, etc., I did manage to get them working, only to have them give me the tell tale "two wheezes" one day at a stop light. I eventually just converted to digital signal sequencers. I thought I would never miss the wheezing old analog units, but for over a year I would pull out of the garage and check to make sure they were actually working. The "wheeze, wheeze, wheeze" told you you had all three sequences. The vacuum operated headlights are another source of anguish as finding the seals and boots is a bit hard (although WCCC finally contracted a repro set that sold out almost immediately). Why? because when the seals go bad you can get a car that winks, or open but not close, or in some cases open and then randomly close while going down the road. What else? The convoluted four hose power steering system. At this moment she is going down the road with a manual conversion. 

 

The pleasure? With the suspension upgrades it handles like a slot car. The 289 runs like a scalded dog with the combo that I am running. The manual four piston disc setup hauls it down quickly and actually doesn't kill your leg in the process. And the other thing is I can go to a car show and will most likely be the only 1st generation Cougar owner at the show. I wouldn't trade that car for anything. Once I get the Borgeson p/s conversion, that will be about the last source of pain with it. Although, if I were to be honest, the "pains" are the type of pains that I wouldn't trade on another ride. I always wanted a 1st generation Cougar, and am fortunate to have one.