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Hagerty Employee

What do you call a group of Corvettes? Collective car nouns, real and imagined

There are some wonderful collective nouns used to describe groups of various animals. For example, a “murder” of crows or a “tower” of giraffes. They’re not official names, true, but language is adaptable, and if enough people adopt a word, then the term can stick. Plus, new collective nouns can be fun, and I envy those that get to coin new examples.

In that vein, I thought I’d come up with some of my own nouns that describe groups of certain cars. 

 

Read the full article at Hagerty.com: https://www.hagerty.com/media/lists/what-do-you-call-group-collective-car-nouns/

142 REPLIES 142
Pit Crew

A collection of Rolls-Royce Phantoms and Ghosts as a haunt

A group of Jeep Wranglers as a corral 

A grid of Porsche Caymans are a bask 

A lot of Chevrolet Bolts is a charge 

...

Hagerty Employee

Good ones! You cold also add Wranglers to the Caballeros in the rodeo.

Pit Crew

Yes, but is the plural of Lotus "Loti"?

Passenger

For several years on various rallies, we non Ferrari drivers have referred to any more than one Ferrari on the road as a 'fiasco of Ferraris'

Passenger

I think it should be called a "Wave of Corvettes"....owners are always talking about "Save the Wave".

Passenger

The late auto writer and race car driver, Denise McCluggage, suggested a group of Toyota Prius should be a "smugness of Priuses."

Passenger

I must disagree about the Highlanders - it would of course be a "clan."

Passenger

An opera of Ferraris, a junkyard of Yugos, a politburo of Ladas, a gershwader of Porsches

Detailer

A group of anything from Great Britain could be referred to as a "grief." And of course, anything equipped with either Lucas or Bosch electrics could be called a "darkness." I like to observe a gathering of early two-stroke motorcycles as a "smoke." Watching videos of cars leaving car shows only to meet with disaster could qualify as a "crash" of Mustangs. But all of these things have but a single definition: sponges of money.