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Bryan
Hagerty Employee

The 2009–13 Aston Martin V12 Vantage is a sure-fire future collectible

In February 2007 I was invited by Aston Martin to the Paul Ricard circuit in the south of France to drive some of its racing cars. Nice job, but not relevant to what we’re discussing here. Except that when we were done, they produced another car, a Vantage road car, and clearly a rather dog-eared prototype. “Have a go in that and tell us what you think,” they said. It turned out to have a V-12 engine under the bonnet. I told them it was the best Aston Martin I’d driven and they’d be insane not to make it.

 

I’m sure the top brass were more than capable of making up their own minds about such things, but two years later, there it was—the Aston Martin V12 Vantage. I still consider it to be one of the very best cars to wear the wings, and I don’t restrict that statement to the modern era, either. It’s one of the very best Astons in the history of the company, DB5s and all.

 

Read the full article on Hagerty.com:

https://www.hagerty.com/media/car-profiles/the-2009-13-aston-martin-v12-vantage-is-a-sure-fire-futur...

 

1 REPLY 1
kyree-williams
Pit Crew

I wonder how preservable these previous-era Aston Martins are, especially compared to--say--a Bentley Continental GT/GTC or a Maserati GranTurismo.

 

Things look promising. The modified Jaguar V8 (with which I am pretty familiar) and Duratec-based V12 are a lot simpler than anything with German engineering. I'm not sure about the automated manual transmission on some of the cars, or the Volvo electrical architecture.