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Hagerty
Hagerty Employee

The 1971 Plymouth GTX is bucking muscle car market norms | Hagerty Media

For many muscle car aficionados, the '68-70 Mopar B-body is the standard-bearer for the class. That single platform gave birth to the Dodge Charger and Super Bee, the Plymouth Road Runner and GTX, plus the less flashy Dodge Coronet, Plymouth Belvedere, and Plymouth Satellite. (All of which could be optioned with potent big-block power.)
https://www.hagerty.com/media/valuation/the-1971-plymouth-gtx-is-bucking-muscle-car-market-norms/
38 REPLIES 38
MoparMan
Advanced Driver

What s stunning beauty! Another car I can add to my "Win The Power Ball" list to obtain....DARN!!! I didn't win again!! *SIGH* Oh, well, maybe next time!! 🙂
MoparToGo64
Pit Crew

very nice!
SteveNL
Intermediate Driver

As someone who was a MOPAR owner and restorer for over 40 years, I'm still perplexed that the '71 GTX would be so very desirable. They sure are ugly. Build quality in the early '70's was rather poor and these cars simply failed to handle or stop very well. At least the late '60's Dart GTs and Barracudas were good looking.

But I guess that's what makes this hobby and passion so interesting. People fall in love with every kind of car.
TinCanSailor
Pit Crew

I guess beauty is in the eye of the beholder! I like the Sebring body style.

In college I had a 69 Roadrunner, and my roomate, coincidentally, had a 71 Roadrunner. My 69 had a 440/727 setup (not original) and his car had a high performance 340, 4 speed, and an 8 3/4 rear. He had gone through the engine and it had a solid lifter cam, high compression pistons, ported heads, headers, etc. It also had been lowered, had big (for the era) tires and wheels, upgraded brakes, and heavy duty anti-sway bars, KYB shocks, and hi-rate springs.

My car was a quarter-mile car (mid-12s) while he had set his car up for top speed, assisted by a set of gears that were something like a 2.76 ratio. I remember being on the interstate one night cruising along at well over 150 mph and the car was stable. Cars today can do that easily, but 40 years ago, that was remarkable.

My Roadrunner is just a memory, but he still has it and it now had a 408 stroker with a Tremec 6 speed. He says it is far faster than it used to be... but I am far older and wiser now, so I will take his word for it! 🙂
Redvette2
Pit Crew

It's the cool looking GTX logos all over the car. I really like the ones by the rear fender. 😉
db2sub1
Pit Crew

Obviously the increase in value for 440 & 426 Hemi '71 GTXs, Mopar's ugly duckling, is not due to improved styling over the earlier cars; or increased performance; so what could it be?? Hmmmm.... maybe... rarity? A small sample size will easily sway survey conclusions.
mfp4073
Intermediate Driver

I agree! The collector car market has become less and less about the car, and more of a paperwork game. People buying and selling pieces of paper with rare numbers and unique codes. The car is secondary in the decision. It reminds me of trading hot rod cards with the neighborhood kids when I was younger. The kid with the rarest card ruled the block.
FlatheadsFoe
Pit Crew

Count me in too... I do not understand how trading titles back and forth for 6 figure sums is even a part of the hobby...
topside
Intermediate Driver

The 68-70 RR & GTX are definitely increasing in price for the nicest ones; not as aggressively as 2nd-Gen Chargers, which have gone nuts. Not GM square-body nuts, but significant. Stands to reason the 71 and 72 models will follow: fewer made, and sexy.
One kink in tracking values is all the rough-condition stuff emerging from hiding; one also has to separate the perfumed pigs that show up at auction. Factory-black Mopars are fairly rare, and generally that's a boost. They're not cheap or easy to restore, either.
fd797
Pit Crew

One of my early recollections of a 71 Roadrunner. West Motor in Preston, ID had a maroon one with black strobe stripes. Had some bigger rubber out back, and the stance seemed perfect. Had the flame-thrower exhausts, and I think it said 440 on the hood scallops. In black. Maroon and black. Man that car looked cool. I spent a lot of time looking at it.

The front turn signals on these are narrower than most cars, and somewhat identifiable at night. I remember seeing one or two at night, and knowing what it was. It stood out. Cool.

One day I remember going with dad on a service call, near Preston. As we approached jumping onto highway 91, it might have been that very Preston Roadrunner, driving by. That sound. I was struck by what it sounded like. Angry. But, I worried that it sounded all revved up – sounded like it wouldn’t actually go that fast – seemed busy just going 55 or so. I remember commenting that, and dad saying it probably would go 120. 120?! That was quite impressionable for my maybe 12 or 13 year old mind. And good enough to imprint fairly heavily on me. Dad, let’s catch it, I said – but we couldn’t in the work van – didn’t even try I recall.

I like these cars.
JAG
Intermediate Driver

All you have to say is "Does that thing have a HEMI in iT? and the MOPAR fans will come a runnin. Sorry a styling failure for sure it all about the low low HEMI and 440 six pack builds, compare this value to a 1970 anything HEMI.
drhino
Advanced Driver

Never understood why these were thought to be a downgrade in styling over the previous design. I always thought these were, hands down, superior. Not even close. Trimmer and more sleek looking; very well proportioned. I don’t see a bad angle.

Similar to the way I feel about the third gen Charger vs. the second. The ‘67 Mustang vs the original. The ‘69-‘71 Chevelle vs the previous design. The second gen Riviera vs. the first.

I know; my opinion is usually unusual. (Although it’s nice to see some folks here of like mind. At least when it comes to the looks of these B-body cars.)
Beestly
Intermediate Driver

That’s an unflattering photo. Those are beautiful cars, and with the N96 Air Grabber option and Hurst pistol grip, they were really cool. The thing many don’t know is that the 1971 model came a year late. It was being designed for the 70 model year and stalled, so dodge and Plymouth changed the front and rear sheet metal on the 68-69 B body to spruce it up a bit to run along side the new E body barracuda and Challenger platform. If you look at the fuselage design of the 71 satellite up next to a 70 barracuda you can see the sister-like similarities. I’m glad the design studios blew it. We got the 1970 Coronet R/T and Superbee and the 1970 Roadrunner out of the deal. Two of the toughest looking muscle cars ever built.
Jerry991
New Driver

I think that the recent auction results prove that muscle cars are now going up in price at the greatest rate that we have seen in years. Mecum's recent sales show cars selling for prices at least double if not triple as compared to what they were selling for as recently as 2 years ago.
JagManBill
Pit Crew

sucks...thanks a lot Hagerty....

I bought one of these - 440 6 pack with 4 spd white vinyl over green w/green interior in 1983 for $400. It had front end issues and even though I rebuilt it it still sat "wonkie". Guy at the alignment shop thought it had been hit or curbed somehow and that the frame might have been tweaked. At that point I couldn't get "hard parts" (except for wrecking yards) so I sold it for $500 a couple of weeks later. Not you throw un in my face that my $400 car is now well over $100k...thanks...why don't you twist the knife as well... 😉
Tinkerah
Instructor

Don't be too hard on yourself, I'm sure everyone reading this has done the same or similar. IF ONLY we knew back then how special the "beaters" we were thrashing around in and throwing away would become.
JGMan
Intermediate Driver

Yeah don’t feel bad JagManBill, in the early 90’s I used to drive by what I thought was a “stupid-looking” ‘69 Dodge Charger on my daily commute on rural Route 55. I knew it was a Charger and it had a ‘69 rear end, but I thought who would force a stupid grill on it with fixed headlights just to pass inspection or something?! Everyone knows ‘69 Chargers are supposed to have hideaway headlights! ... Except if it’s the ultra-cool, uber-rare, built for NASCAR production numbers ‘68 Charger 500! This was wasting away at the edge of a field, by the road and mailboxes, with weeds growing around it - which everyone also knows is the universal sign for “Its for sale.” Well many years later when I realized what it was, it was gone. But hey, its not like I actually bought it and then sold it for only a hundred bucks more!! (Sorry Bill.)
mwmyers91
Detailer

Mopar is always in my wheelhouse, but 68 to70 rules the field.
ed
Intermediate Driver

The effect of the .COM bubble is back in spades. The stock market continues to go up, and everybody's got spendin' money. I'm an old geezer with a good bag of play money. Prices for what we think we 'always wanted' go up.  Personally, I'll take something more contemporary with 500HP, AC, leather and a good sound system (rattle-the-windows good), and be very happy with it

CP66
Intermediate Driver

A friend of mine had a badass mid 70's Camaro at one time, a real ground pounder! Like many of us he parted ways with it many moons ago and lamented it's departure for years. A few years ago he had pretty much decided to recreate the car and had started the search for a suitable donor. I tried to convince him to go after a New Challenger, Mustang, Camaro or even some type of high powered Euro trash. I used the same arguments you laid out; AC, excellent stereo, won't ride like a tank, won't require constant tuning to keep it optimal and best of all FACTORY WARRANTY and dealer support. All of this while out handling, accelerating and braking that ground pounder he lusted after.

To this day he thanks me regularly for talking him into one of the new bad boy challengers that he bought! Now if I could only follow my own advice!!
Dave404
Intermediate Driver

I think people are finally realizing that those cars have a look like nothing before or since and are true mean machines. I always liked them but like many, thought they were 2nd place to the '68-'70 cars. Not anymore. They are now old enough to be true classic muscle. The last of the best.
acooper529
Intermediate Driver

Wow! you dumped my post? That was a huge waste of time writing that I guess.
CP66
Intermediate Driver

Mistook you for DB perhaps?
Exsanguinator
Pit Crew

Just as ugly as they've always been.
Chrskj87
New Driver

Most of the younger generations who are into muscle cars can't (or won't) afford the more popular cars.
So we (I'm a millennial... Where's my Diploma?) look for cheaper alternatives to fulfill our muscle-car needs and it only makes sense that the previously not so popular cars now rise in value is a result of rise in demand. The plus side of rising values is the added support from the aftermarket: more parts reproductions (hopefully).
ScottC
Intermediate Driver

I remember back in the late 70's when I was in high school you couldn't give a Mopar away, went and looked at a 72 challenger with a 440 six pack and the guy was asking $1000 for it and couldn't even get it started so I wound up buying a 74 Z28 instead.
OLDERbastard1
Detailer

Strangely enough the older I get, the more I appreciate SOME of the vehicles I disliked in my youth. Guess it's because if you lived in that era, it made a different impression on you than the people that are looking back (and never had the chance to experience it 1st hand). Each to their own. Keep up the excellent articles. Thanks.
KenJen
Pit Crew

I seem to recall a friend of mine bought a 1971 Plymouth Satellite, dark brown, white vinyl top, white interior with a bench seat even, but it had a 383 4 barrel carb. I always thought it was a cool ride, in an almost "cool granny car" kinda way! Let me assure you, it was no granny car, that car was seldom ever defeated in a "street 1/4 mile" race! I was with him on several occasions racing other than Mopar opponents and we almost always won by a good margin! It was quick off the line and pulled hard all the way to the end, plus it didn't sit there and spin the tires off the line. We never did really figure out why that car was so quick, but enjoyed that it was, until his dad offered to buy him a new 1977 280Z, and the Plymouth was quickly traded in!!
carguyjim
Intermediate Driver

In my humble "Car Guy" opinion, these final Mopars are bloated clumsy versions of their supercar predecessors.... This choice Hemi stick car is "investment grade" to be sure, but visually incomparable to earlier Charger, Roadrunner etc.
Cool-isAmerican
Pit Crew

Never liked these cars!! I felt that the nose was too long and awkwardly shaped and the wheel well openings should have been rounded out for them to look right with the remaining body styling. Generally the roof line and rear of the car were ok but the overall design was just not up to par with the earlier cars. That said I felt the same with the vast majority of the cars that came out starting in 1970 going forward; most of the mustangs and many GM vehicles were just not right starting about then and got progressively worse going forward, not to mention the power for those cars really began to get terrible; at least the Mopar cars talked about here still had very strong drive-trains in them for a while. Noticed many of the comments talked about Datsun Z cars as alternatives.....no wonder Japanese cars took off about that time, they began to have styling that surpassed most American cars unfortunately!!
Bettyemae
Intermediate Driver

Seems like Plymouth knocked off the butt ugly AMC Matador to come up with this car.
JGMan
Intermediate Driver

If its soooo ugly, why did they put Vin Diesel in one in a Fast & Furious movie? (The Fate of the Furious). AMC Matadors don’t sell millions of movie tickets, but sexy ‘71 Roadrunner/GTX’s do.
OkJustOneMore
Intermediate Driver

Well im biased because my first car in high school in 1984 was a 71 GTX. I wanted a 69 Charger. The price was $1500 for the GTX and $2800 for the Charger. Well economics won out. My GTX was a great car. Wish i kept it but sold it before i graduated because the law was following me to and from school. Was tired of being harassed. I was able to buy that same Charger on my 23rd birthday so i did eventually get my dream car and have it 32 years later.
CPrize
New Driver

To each their own, personally I love mine. Not sure why anyone would go out of their way to comment on a car they do not like. As for price it really only matters for those who wish to buy or sell. At least being valuable means they are less likely to get scrapped like so many others.
JGMan
Intermediate Driver

Haters gotta hate! I love the 1971-2’s, and I had a ‘73 Road Runner in high school (which was still quick enough for most street encounters in the early 80’s when new cars were still WEAK. Top speed over 140 (tested). I do agree with Hater Bettyemae, however, that the 1976-78 AMC Matador is the ugliest American car ever made. (Maybe that makes me a hater too? But I wouldn’t say it after an article about Matadors!) But as my dad used to say, that’s what makes horse races, (everyone has their favorite)
60Caddy
Pit Crew

When I was 17 and had a 69 Chevelle all of my buddies ( All Mopar Fanatic's) and all eight to ten years older than myself ran 68 and 69 Chargers all 440's 70 71 and 72 road runners and GTX's. I helped one of my closes friends change his 72 Runner from 400 automatic to 440 four speed. Now this is were things get wild,We purchased a 74 Road runner that was factory four speed original paint, rally wheels ect. tore it apart like we worked in a junk yard, purchased a 70 Imperial with 375 HP 440. found the correct flywheel ( 440's are Balanced externally unlike a 400) sawzall'd the the floor hump out for the shifter and voila 440 4 speed 72 Runner. after a repaint and new strobe strip Mike sold the Runner for $5000.00. I did not get the value of it all at the time. I understand today. Mopar's are cool, especially with the pistol grip 4 speed. Now onto selling my buddy a sure grip 8 and 3/4 391 ratio for his 70 Runner with an air grabber, he almost cried as he told me a Chevy guy was taking advantage of a mopar man!
60Caddy
Pit Crew

Just checked the back story it all happen in 1981 or 82. Time gets away from us all Gear heads
GTX
New Driver

71 GTX ok but IMHO the one and only GTX is the 1967. Great sleek, straight lines and powerful (for the period) 440 coupled with the legendary 727 and Dana rear, a real classic beauty. Had one as a kid and now have a 1966 Belvedere (same body style) almost finished with restoration including 440 and 727.
Just re-living my youth!