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Hagerty
Hagerty Employee

Review: 2022 Ford Maverick XLT

Disclaimer: We've had trouble getting a Maverick from Ford's press fleet, so I had Matt Fink rent the first one he could find. Since then, Ford has offered us a press vehicle, which I'll be reviewing in the near future. In the meantime, enjoy this review of a real-world, unprepped rental Maverick, just the way you could buy it.
https://www.hagerty.com/media/new-car-reviews/review-2022-ford-maverick-xlt/
62 REPLIES 62
DavidSuzyWilson
Pit Crew

THE ABOVE COMES WITH SOME FEATURES NOT INCLUDED IN MY FULLY LOADED 2019 RANGER LARIAT.
FOR SOME REASON, FORD CHEAPED OUT ON SOME ITEMS FOR THE RANGER.
THE CENTRE ARM REST IS ONLY GOOD FOR THE DRIVER.
THERE ARE NO POWER POINTS IN THE REAR TRUCK BED, 12V OR OTHERWISE.
NO STORAGE BINS IN THE TRUCK BED OR BOTTLE OPENER LOL
TO NOT INCLUDE HVAC VENTS IN THE REAR ON THE STANDARD MODEL IS PRETTY BAD IN THIS DAY AND AGE, SERIOUSLY??

MattFink
Advanced Driver

Good points. Do you wish you had the Maverick option when you bought your Ranger?
RallyRaid
Detailer

I can’t believe Ford didn’t bother with RHD markets for the Bronco/Bronco Sport and Maverick. The Bronco would be in huge demand in Australia and South Africa, as a cheaper (and cheaper to run) alternative to the Defender for the same varied demographic. The Bronco Sport would probably lead its segment in these countries and also be the right size for the UK and Japan (although Japanese can and will buy LHD models). And while the Maverick lacks the class-defying appeal of the former, it is a good size for all of these markets.
As an aside, a rebadged (with identical styling) GQ Patrol was sold as the Ford Maverick in the late ‘80s-early ‘90s
DaveA
Instructor

Give Ford some time. Right now they are having production issues and can’t build enough vehicles for their primary market. Once that is sorted they’ll have time to explore different markets.
JGeske
Instructor

I find it hilarious that, after years of panning the Honda Ridgeline (and in years past the Subaru Brat/Baja and Dodge Rampage) as not really a truck for being a: unibody, AWD/FWD, independent suspension, having "ONLY" 1600lb payload/5000lb towing, vehicle with a bed, the collective automotive press are going gaga for and losing their minds for a: unibody, AWD/FWD, independent suspension, 1500lb payload/4000lb towing (note the lesser capacity than the Honda), vehicle with a bed. This said, I do like the Maverick, the Santa Cruz, and the Ridgeline and hope they spawn a whole lot of competitors.

I strongly suspect the change of heart after all of these years has to do with two things, only one of which I agree with: 1) It costs a lot less than the Honda (I agree with this as a competitive factor), 2) It has a Ford badge rather than Honda (which shows why I distrust the biases of the auto reviewers and disagree with the bias).
JGeske
Instructor

I would like to point out why I do think the Maverick will be popular, but also how perception is everything: 

 

The Maverick will sell well because it is very versatile for its size, which is a great size for city/town dwellers who want utility. It has a 199in length/121 in wheelbase, with a 4/5 person capacity and a bed capacity of 33.3 cubic feet/1500lbs payload, coupled with either 2000lbs or 4000lbs of towing. This compact size makes it maneuverable while providing a lot of hauling capacity. If a bed cap were added, this cargo capacity would theoretically double in volume to around 70-80 cubic feet. This is a fantastic package and looks nice too. Plus, cost is low.

 

Another vehicle that is exactly, if not more, capable, but has a poor image: The Dodge Grand Caravan. Looking at the 5th Gen (2008-2020), we have: 202 inch length/121 inch wheelbase, up to 7 passengers, with all 3 rows of seats up it has 33 cubic feet of storage (which increases to 83 and then 143 depending on how many seats you stow, in the 5 passenger equivalent to the Maverick, the 83 applies) and 1540lbs of payload, and 3600lbs of towing. So a vehicle the same size as the Maverick offers the option for 2 more passengers, anywhere between the same to 4x the cargo volume, slightly more payload (and the ability to store 4x8 sheets of material fully inside the vehicle), and either 1600lbs more towing or only 400lbs less, depending on which Maverick you compare to it. All of this for a price range that was very similar to the Maverick, depending on how equipped, and similar fuel economy if you compare the non-Hybrid Ford to the van.

 

So, they are comparable/identical in size and price, but one is way more versatile, and yet I think I know which one the majority of people would prefer to be seen in. Perception is what will sell the Maverick, not its amazing practicality, even though the practicality is what I like about it. 

MattFink
Advanced Driver

That's a very interesting comparison. Had not thought about it, but you may be on to something.
miata93
Instructor

This vehicle makes a lot more sense than a crossover that has a 3rd seat row that never gets used.
MattFink
Advanced Driver

Very well said. I personally love the Ridgeline and would love to own one (if they didn't hold their value so well!). It is way nicer than the Maverick honestly. I did not mention it as a competitor only because of the large cost difference (and it's a little bigger).
Chris25
New Driver

Love reading the review, very informative and gives one desire to go check out this truck.
MattFink
Advanced Driver

Thanks!
ConvertibleGuy
New Driver

I would by one if it wasn't made in Mexico. Buy American and UAW! I know the price would be higher but I would gladly pay it to keep good union jobs in America.
miata93
Instructor

If they made a hybrid AWD version that could tow 3500#, I would consider it.