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Hagerty
Hagerty Employee

Revealed: 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning | Hagerty Media

Ford just yanked the silk off its new, all-electric 2022 F-150 Lightning pickup, the next salvo in the company's wave of all-electric vehicles, following the E-Transit van line and controversial Mustang Mach-E. Although that pudgy pony and the rolling cargo-toaster were nice first steps, let's make one thing clear: This all-electric pickup is arguably the company's single most important EV release to date.
https://www.hagerty.com/media/news/revealed-2022-ford-f-150-lightning/
191 REPLIES 191
RonD
Intermediate Driver

Agree, no tax breaks or credits, let the market decide...I don't want my taxpayer $ subsidizing an affluent person (as they're the ones that can afford to purchase an EV due to cost) in buying an EV.

JZ
New Driver

Can you put a snow plow on it.
trymes
Intermediate Driver

Technically, the only F-150s that Ford officially supports using with a snow plow are those with the 5.0 V8, I think. Having said that, you could put a snow plow on a Honda Accord if you wanted to.

JZ
New Driver

Yes. Have a plow on my 2018 with the 5.0.

Went to the Ford website, was on chat for about a 1/2 hour, asked about putting a plow on it.

The person could not answer my question.

tdskip
Intermediate Driver

It would probably be great at that since all the torque is available from a stop.
BMD4800
Instructor

It IS great because of that. And in trucks with a 2 or 3 speed reduction, the essential high-torque tip-in does not negate highway speed motor efficiencies.

The EV future is hanging on 1 thing- Battery tech.

I’m fighting the good fight with 700 HP of boosted ICE fury, yet with current motor and controller tech, that figure is laughable.

But the batteries…

As soon as carbon matrix lattice battery tech is proved wide-scale and we have wide-scale public acceptance of Thorium U233 reactors, fossil fuels will be as obsolete as burning peat.
Smithsonite
Intermediate Driver

I cringe when I think of these things after 5 years of road salt intrusion into all that wiring, and electric motors. Wonder how long they'll make it before they either crap out on the side of the road, or catch fire. My job as an auto tech is secure, looks like.

OldRoad
Instructor

Wouldn't try to go through wheel high creeks with all that tricity underneath.
tcchuck2005
Pit Crew

The lightning name makes sense being electric. But I was really hoping to see an option of getting a 2WD standard cab short box, for nostalgia sake.
trymes
Intermediate Driver

@tcchuck2005: I'd love it, too. Ford could literally sell dozens and dozens of them!

Musco03
Pit Crew

Great Biden gave Ford his blessing!
Great again, spend on average $60,000 bucks for a truck that will go 200 miles and DIE!!!
Plus spent 50 minutes of your life to go another 75 to 80 miles and then hunt down another charging station.
Sounds like a no brainer to me.
Oh the truck will power your house for three days, what do they mean by power? Lights, I don't think so in Florida no power means no AIR CONDITIONING DUH!
I think I will pass on the truck maybe a golf cart for starters.
Air_and_Water
Detailer

Nobody is claiming it fits everyone's use case. If you even semi-regularly drive long distances, then a dino-burner is for you. This has far more range than I'd ever need, plus it's a power station, is faster and cheaper to run than my Honda Fit. If you refuse to give them a chance, then that's on you. You're artificially limiting yourself for no logical reason.

Modern electric cars like golf carts like your gas vehicle is a minibike. There's literally no comparison other than the basic motive power. Don't like it or it doesn't fit your use case? That's fine. They have gassers a few parking spots down.
Musco03
Pit Crew

I agree with everything you say.
But just think about every vehicle in the country plugged in every night, I could be wrong but do you believe that the grid will be able to handle the demand especially after the green new deal gets rid of ALL fossil fuel and only renewable energy is available.
Think Texas!
Just saying
Smithsonite
Intermediate Driver

Ford can't even build a reliable gasoline engine anymore ... yet they expect me to buy this emerging technology with confidence?

WOW ... ok. Good luck with that!
tdskip
Intermediate Driver

@Smithsonite - actually the hybrid and electric cars that Ford has already produced have a pretty good reliability history, as do their conventional cars, but hey, there is that reality thing popping up again...
BMD4800
Instructor

That’s my point all along! Plug in hybrids. They are the current proven tech that will be developed with battery tech.
Smithsonite
Intermediate Driver

HA! You're obviously not an auto technician. Thanks for the laugh on, "as do their conventional cars"! That was funny!!

BMD4800
Instructor

The EV debate is always a button for folks. One group says “coal powered” the other says “science denier”.

Well, here is a link, check for yourselves…

https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=427&t=3

Fossil fuels account for 60.3% of electricity generation. 19.3% is coal, 40.3% is Nat Gas. So, kudos to the Pro-EV team for your technical victory.

But, that kind of misses the major point that we have proven technology to produce CNG vehicles that can be fueled in significantly less time with little infrastructure changes required. But, let’s set that aside for now.

19.7% of electricity comes from Nuclear plants. Hmm, we are up to 80% of the total power produced.

Certainly the 19.8% of renewables is good, right? Yeah, except wind and Hydroelectric dominate with 15.7%. And don’t forget my personal favorite-BioMass. For all you science folks, that’s burning trees, 1.4%.

Solar Electric, the cord-free eco-solution to all your carbon phobias, accounts for a whopping 2.3% of global electric production.

Now, back to EVs.
We have a resource issue. Lithium mining and Cobalt mining. Battery production and the production of Aluminum. These are immensely resource dependent and at this time, we are simply displacing the pollution from one location, to another.

The greater insult is the productivity aspect. 10-14 hrs to charge with a 60 Amp, 240 volt charger. Let me boil this down folks, service folks don’t sit in an office chair from 9-5, then go home. A 14 hour day is common and even 40 minutes to charge (on a job site?) is at best a logistical stretch. But back at the contractor’s house, if he/she/xe has modern house, it is probably majority electric. A couple air handlers and A/C units, electric stove/oven, electric dryer, and now a 60 Amp charger. Wait, the significant other of the contractor has an urban commuter, they can get by with a 40 Amp charger (these are raw numbers, remember your duty cycles). Every home will require updated service, updated panel, and updated wiring to accommodate. This will put demand on the grid. What’s the easiest, quickest, and most reliable way to expand the grid? Burning fossil fuels.

But but, the environment…don’t you care about the Polar Bears?!

We have the tech right now, to build plug-in hybrids, with high-efficiency CNG powered Diesel style engines, that both significantly reduce fuel consumption AND projected demand on Lithium, Cobalt and other rare earths.

Oh yes, I almost forgot…southwest roof top solar. If I covered my entire roof with Solar (which rarely meet their ROI expectations due to sand pitting of the glass and subsequent reduced output) and added a Tesla charge wall or 2, it would take ALL day to generate enough juice to recharge the truck.

Or, for less than the cost to install wiring and a 60 Amp charger, I can get a CNG compressor and refuel my vehicle at home. Thus eliminating the efficiency loss…

Thanks for playing, this was fun.
trymes
Intermediate Driver

@BMD4800: CNG has major energy density issues, and while you might be able to install a compressor to refuel at home, it won't be cheap. Even then, like an EV, you'll occasionally need public refueling sites, not to mention people who cannot fuel at home because they live in apartments or in cities (this is also an issue for EVs). In that case you run into the issue of CNG infrastructure being expensive, slow, and far more difficult to install and maintain than a comparable EV public charging network.

Look at the scale of the Supercharger network, built out in less than a decade. Local approvals, siting, and construction are all *far* simpler and cheaper than a similar CNG station, or even a gas station, for that matter. Then imagine how much money, time, and effort would be required to build a similar CNG network. https://www.tesla.com/findus?v=2&bounds=47.09947216734131%2C-76.30016451508246%2C30.48582606169548%2...

BMD4800
Instructor

You are 100% correct about CNG energy density issues. But, they exist in the EV world as well.

CNG refueling is far more advanced than you present. Many big cities have CNG refilling locations. CNG fleets are not uncommon as the present tax benefits and emissions credits.

The cost to purchase and install a home compressor is still cheaper than the panel and service upgrade, along with the charger and 60 amp circuit. That’s at my house, with my suppliers. The per mile cost of Electric vs CNG is cheaper for CNG, but that depends upon time of day charging, etc. SouthWest Gas and SRP power.

In some places Natural gas service isn’t as common, but in this area, CNG is a reasonable alternative and refueling is as easy as an EV charger.

From an acceleration and performance standpoint? CNG has nothing on EV. No question.

But none of this back and forth changes the fact that battery technology is not to the point that will support an all EV future, but it IS at a point where a plug-in high efficiency hybrid should be the focus.

From my standpoint, the push for full EVs before the tech is ready, is a monumental blunder. Much easier to convince folks that plug-ins will work, because they do. What’s the difference between a Prius or Tahoe hybrid and one with a plug-in option? The onboard charger and an outlet. Forget to charge the hybrid, gotta drop everything and go? Swing by Chevron and fill it up. Get folks used to electric, plugging in, then as the battery tech improves, the transition is seamless and natural.

Instead, we’re New Coking the transportation industry at our own peril.
Bunka
Intermediate Driver

The path to EVs has been written. The prologue and first few chapters have been published. The USA did not write it. The prologue was written in Germany and the first few chapters in the European union. USA car manufacturers have to follow suit. They have big business overseas. USA businessmen will profit with building charging stations and charging us for using them. Car/Truck manufacturers will continue to profit. The horse is out of the barn. We are all ready on the path. There is profit to be made. The next step will be to build Hydrogen powered cars. That prologue is being written in Asia.
BMD4800
Instructor

Sorry, Hydrogen is worse than CNG in terms of energy density and energy return.

Hydrogen fuel cells are worse yet. They suffice a zero tailpipe dream, but H2 requires liqufication for a reasonable range.

Lbs for pound, with the tech we have now, plug in hybrid with high-efficiency ICEs are the in-place, proven bridge to the future.
DrOverboost
Pit Crew

What happens if someone backs their new truck into the water at a boat ramp. What will that look like?
trymes
Intermediate Driver

@DrOverboost: Assuming that they do it correctly and don't actually back the truck all of the way into the lake, it'll look just like any other truck loading/unloading a boat.

Do you think that Ford didn't think to seal the battery like every other EV? It's also up much higher than your average EV battery, and is unlikely to get wet, just as you don't generally submerge your fuel tank at the boat ramp.

BMD4800
Instructor

Same thing when a gas powered one does. Corrosion in the body and engine harness, major component loss, typically a total loss declaration.
GForce
Pit Crew

Not mentioned in this article (that I read anyway) was what towing does to the range. I read another article that stated that even though the truck has a 10,000 lb trailer capacity. A 5,600 trailer would reduce the range to about 100 miles (not sure if this was standard or extended range). But that would mean family boating or camping trips are out. What's the point of having a truck then? I know this will be a great "niche" vehicle. And construction foremen or others that just go site to site checking on the progress will be okay with this and it may work well for them. Like the experimental Ford Ranger EVs in the 90's or early 2000's, electric companies and EMC will be snatching them up for checking meters or for the bosses to drive around. But for most of the real world, this may be a good start, but it won't get them out of a petro burning truck.
TC
New Driver

OldRoad is mostly correct. Our power comes from mostly coal and natural gas. Some water and some nukes. Solar and wind are barely there when it comes to capacity. Solar and wind will never supplant coal and natural gas due to the amount of land it takes to barely eeek out some electricity and then transmit it. EV's state that they have lower service costs but that is not a tested long term study. Once everyone starts replacing very expensive batteries and motors, the true cost will be realized. I would buy a new Lighting for local use but will still need a gas or hybrid truck to get my work done. We are getting there but it will be a very long road.
tdskip
Intermediate Driver

@TC - simply not accurate on power generation. As noted elsewhere there are regular occurrences in the day when California not only gets more than half of its electrical energy from renewable’s but approaching 95%.
mhealy1
Detailer

Not true. Even California government stats don’t support that number.
The real numbers are out there. Please look them up and educate yourself.
trymes
Intermediate Driver

@TC: Actually, Most of our power comes from Nuclear, Coal, and Natural gas. And while it would be better if it came from something else, EVs still have a lower carbon footprint when fueled using these sources, so long as they aren't just parked and never driven.

Maybe this very first generation truck can't do what you need for work, but that's fine. This is the very beginning of EVs. The technology is moving very rapidly, and it was less than a decade ago that EVs were crappy little city runabouts that made no sense. Now it's a snap to drive one from one side of the country to the other (so long as it's a Tesla, the other charging networks are still catching up, for now).

Tim
Instructor

Wow. Remember this day as the day the automotive landscape changed in America. When the best-selling vehicle in America for longer than the age of most of the population puts out an all-electric version and does it this well, a seismic shift happens.

As has been mentioned, the stakes were not just high, but practically life-or-death for the design of this vehicle, and Ford really worked every detail correctly. There is essentially all of the capability of the gas-powered version (and in some areas, even more). But the clincher is that it comes at a price that seems comparable to the gas-powered options.

No, the electric version isn't going to suddenly take over the majority of F150 sales. But this sure feels like a fork in the road, and it's just the first version. I've not considered an EV purchase before, mostly because the options always seemed to come with some significant compromises. This F150 appears to have removed or diminished them all.
Islander
Intermediate Driver

So, what's the average cost of a fill-up?

I'm not impressed with the design. A trunk in the front? Make it cab forward (2 doors) with plenty of bed. Why design it to look like what it was, it's a new thing.

It should come with a large fire blanket. When these batteries ignite smothering is the only way to deal with the situation and it takes at least two people.
Brandan
Hagerty Employee

If it were cab-forward it wouldn't be an F-series and if it were a two-door it wouldn't be worth building because the market isn't there.
Islander
Intermediate Driver

How silly of me to think forward, I recall those first cell phones, basically a clone of the old wireless landline receivers, 'took awhile for the design to advance.
When I drove trucks, it was just me 90% of the time, 'never needed more than two doors but I often did need the bed space. A vehicle cannot be all things to all people, especially an all electric pick-em up truck.
I see a slick-looking cab sitting ahead of a flatbed with all sorts of clever toolbox options, no it won't look like an F150 E because it likely won't be a Ford anyway.
BMD4800
Instructor

“ So, what's the average cost of a fill-up?”

It depends on your power company, time of use (connected to the charger), your plan, etc. generally overnight power generation is cheaper.

Here, $0.13/kW/Hr.
Depending upon the efficiency of the charger and rate, $20-25. For the same range, $10-15 cheaper than the F150 egoboosted crewcab sitting outside. Towing? Far closer.
Islander
Intermediate Driver

So, you're not buying gas, but the electric bill goes up (unless you sneak the juice somehow - boy think of all the scenarios with that).
What do you think a charging station will charge per kW/hr?
BWeston
Pit Crew

While I'm still not an E-vehicle enthusiast - the starting / base price estimated at $40,000 is a real game-changer in this category - and that's before the $7,500 tax credit you get from the gov't! That makes it less expensive than most regular gas powered F-150's, not to mention almost HALF as expensive as base level E-Trucks from GM (the Hummer) - or Tesla with its yet-to-go-into production, ridiculous looking "Darth Vader truck", or others allegedly coming to production from small independent manufs like Rivian, Bollinger, Lordstown Motors, etc...glad I don't have any investment $$'s in those small start-ups!
trymes
Intermediate Driver

@BWeston: That's for the XL trim, which few buy. There will certainly be a premium for the Lightning. Move into the Lariat trim and spec out the 240V outlet in the back, plus the larger battery and so on, and you'll be up in the $70k range quite quickly.

BWeston
Pit Crew

...totally agree the base XL with 230 mile range and more basic charging options is not where the volume will be - but even if you get the high-end 300 mile range battery pack, plus premium charging & nicely optioned truck - $70k still compares very favorably to almost any other E - truck coming out in the near future.  Not to mention advantage of F-Series being a real, proven, top-selling truck to begin with - and the large Ford dealer service network.  I can't see how these new independents are going to effectively compete in this E-truck category.  While GM has the higher priced and more powerful / capable Hummer coming out, I don't see anything in the way of an upcoming competitor that's viable in the RAM lineup either. 

rxk9394
Intermediate Driver

Imagine a bunch of cowboys sitting around 100 years ago talkin' smack about those stupid AUTOMOBILES that are being driven by those dummies stupid enough to buy them...

"I saw one of those broke down cause it ran out of Gasoline! Hell, there ain't no gasoline in these parts and never will be!"
"You know my horse runs cleaner than those smelly things and when it quits we just bury 'em!"
"They only go 15 miles in an hour and will only go for 3 hours before running out o' Gasoline! I heard tell they will never be able to improve on that too! Best it will ever be! Now my ol' horse there can go all day with only stoppin' for feed and water a few times so she don't die on me!"

Now I am a huge huge fan of the internal combustion engine, but these new EV's are also very intriguing to me and I welcome the advancements they will be bringing to the concept of personal transport machines in the future.
trymes
Intermediate Driver

This comment nailed it, @rxk9394. The current crop of EVs may not be right for everyone, but they're right for many, and they are rapidly improving. Imagine the hysterical laughter that would have ensued if you had told someone in 2010 that in 2022 Ford would be producing a 300 mile BEV F-150 that could do 0-60 in 4.4 seconds! They would have pointed to the barely introduced first-generation Nissan Leaf and said "HAH! There's no way that technology is going to improve that quickly, you fool!"

Pilott
Pit Crew

rxk9394, I really liked your post ... seriously, it was one of the best. I just kept thinking that we would have been better off as a species if we had just remained in harmony with our environment like the Native Americans did for thousands of years ... or maybe we should never have become self-aware and remained little hairy guys living on the edge of the jungle.
It's our brains that got us where we are (negatively changing our one and only home in this universe) and it's our brains that will be our undoing. So the cowboys were right ... but for reasons beyond what they were discussing. We are so naive thinking we are always making "progress". Each new "development" takes us further toward our end as a species.
No species is infinite. We are simply preparing this planet for what comes next.
Doom & gloom? ... not at all. Just clear reflective thinking based on the 100 thousand foot view.
Yoloswaggins
New Driver

Lol
JBaguley
Pit Crew

Great article, fascinating product, very impressive if it lives up to the promises. Personally, I don't believe the pricing projections - with the average conventional pick-up drive out pricing north of $50k, I can't see electric ones realistically priced under $40k.

One small nit, it is not a throttle, nor is it a gas pedal. "Accelerator" is okay. Hit the electron pedal? Jam on the Juice?? Well, we still roll up windows.....
trymes
Intermediate Driver

Why does everyone get hung up on that? It's the gas pedal. You don't say "Step on the distillate" when you're driving a Diesel, do you?

markvii1
Intermediate Driver

Ludicrous Speed, engage! We're going plaid!
Ragster
Intermediate Driver

I DON'T believe in all Electric vehicles...........the TREE huggers and & the REST of us are going to PAY DEARLY for this in the NEAR future !!!
trymes
Intermediate Driver

It doesn't matter, @Ragster, electric vehicles believe in you.

TheModelCitizen
Pit Crew

A recent test of the VW ID.4 electric in Car and Driver noted that the range fell from the claimed 250 miles to 190 miles in 40 degree weather. Coupled with a similar charging time (38 minutes to get to 80%) compared to this Ford taking "just" 41 minutes (assuming there is a free charging stall when you get there) still makes pure electric a real deal killer for me on any vehicle that I would want to use for a long distance road trip.
Air_and_Water
Detailer

If you're getting an electric car for a "long distance road trip" at this stage of the game you're doing it wrong.

Electric cars are great, but they have their limitations. If they fit your use case they can be vastly superior to gassers, though. I think about getting an electric car every time I get gas in January. I'd rather unplug to an already warmed-up car (which can be done remotely while you're car is still plugged in) with a "full tank" every day than get gas in winter. But hey, I commute.