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Hagerty
Hagerty Employee

Piston Slap: Pi are square in the Studebaker's engine displacement | Hagerty Media

Kevin writes: My '64 Studebaker Daytona has its original 289 cid V-8 and has had the cylinders bored out 0.060. Can you tell me what the displacement would be now? Sajeev answers: Oh man, I am totally getting flashbacks to grade school math class! Calculating engine displacement requires determining three values: The number of cylinders, [...]
https://www.hagerty.com/media/advice/piston-slap/piston-slap-pi-are-square-in-the-studebakers-engine...
3 REPLIES 3
NightRanger
Intermediate Driver

"which is π times the radius, squared"
The comma in your expression of the formula implies the wrong calculation IMHO .
The formula is "pi times R to the second power" which is executed as: pi times (radius squared). You have to square the radius before multiplying by pi.
Your original statement gives the impression of: "(pi times radius), squared" which gives a vastly different and incorrect answer. Perhaps to be more clear express as: "π, times the radius squared"
Cheers
NightRanger
Intermediate Driver

Also reminds me of the scene from the Beverly Hillbillies, when Jethro is explaining to Uncle Jed what he learned in school that day:
Jethro: "I learned pi R squared"
Uncle Jed: "Pies ain't square boy, They's round. Corn bread's square"
Sajeev
Community Manager

Oh yeah, "π, times the radius squared" is the accurate and clearer way to write out a formula. I made that change now. 


Still can't believe I had to write that formula out in the first place, but whatever!