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Hagerty Employee

Music for your Road, no. 6: The Guitars That Took Over The World, Part 2 | Hagerty Media

This is a continuation of a long essay. Obviously, I think the subject matter deserves extensive coverage. In Part 1, I examined the societal and technological contexts of the development of the electric guitar. For me, the electric guitar was the most important musical invention of the 20th century.
https://www.hagerty.com/media/opinion/music-for-your-road/music-for-your-road-no-6-the-guitars-that-...
23 REPLIES 23
Flashman
Technician

...Newport, Rhode Isaland’s..."?
johnmarianmarks
Intermediate Driver

Mea culpa; sed non mea maxima culpa est.

JM
(Fakin' that Latin, since 1963. Jack B.: Feel free to correct me publicly.)
audiobycarmine
Instructor

If there’s a Part III in the works, please consider Jan Akkerman and Steve Hackett.
Most who’ve heard those names will think “Art-Rock & Prog-Rock”, but they both have some really serious classical chops and taste. Check ‘em out — a believer you shall be…
DUB6
Gearhead

Oboy, some new vinyl to look for!  Certainly agree that the electric guitar is THE instrument of the modern musical age.  Chet Atkins is my all-time favorite, but when Rock electrified, my heart and head fell into line pretty quickly.

johnmarianmarks
Intermediate Driver

My educated guess is, that the best combination of music and recording quality plus eBay affordability is this:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/402802142963

Best of luck,

john
56NomadJohn
Pit Crew

Interesting, but why is this on Hagerty?
DUB6
Gearhead

   I may be inventing justification for this, but my take is that classic car folks (and I realize that not all Hagerty people are into "classic cars" in the traditional sense - and also that there may not even be a "traditional sense" anywhere buy in my head 😊) - but anyway - that those who are like me put the driving experience and the music experience together.  Especially Rock, but not exclusively.

   Just yesterday, I was talking to a Mobile DJ friend at a small car gathering.  I remarked that when I was a kid, my folks were listening to '30s and '40s Big Band, Swing, Jazz, and I was as entertained by Lawrence Welk as by Elvis.  Then Rock hit, then the British Invasion, and I also began exploring the old school Country tunes.  I told him that I felt blessed to have listened to learned to appreciate many types of music (including some great classical melodies and symphonies when I want to chill out and relax) - but that I keep centering back to music that features the Electric Guitar.  I wondered if all of the genres I love would just fade out as the younger (boom-boom bass and hip-hop) crowd grew in to eminence.  His take (and he's nearly 20 years younger than me) is that the "classic rock" scene is indeed suffering, but that he actually sees a lot of interest from "30-somethings" in some retro rock stuff and a LOT of requests for '80s music from Gen X'rs.

   Anyway, I find the tie-in between Electric Guitar Rock and "For The Road" an engaging subject, as I've spend many hours building playlists for my drive-time, from long trips, to late night driving, to classic car cruising, to I-Wanna-Forget-My-Troubles-And-Just-Drive times.

   Now, to finish up @56NomadJohn, I gotta tell ya: in the late '60s a buddy had a '56 Nomad, and it was my favorite car of all the cars I had or our other friends had for a very long time.  So when I read your 'handle', I was loathe to even sound like I was showing any opposite views to yours, because frankly, if you've got a '56 Nomad, IMHO, you are indeed a god!

Jack_Hagerty
Moderator

Good question -- I'm the fellow who paid John Marks to write this, so here's my answer.

 

There's a subset of people who read Hagerty and think we should focus on nothing but cars from... say, 1953 to 1971. Other people think we're not giving Brass Era enough love. Still others say we should focus on the modern classics. Then you have people who want to read nothing but Chip Foose and Wayne Carini stories.

 

Automotive enthusiasm is a big tent. It covers everybody from the Brass Era restorer to the fellow who gets a Lexus IS500 instead of an IS300. A lot of these people want to talk about music, travel, all the things surrounding the cars we love. John Marks is one of the best-credentialed music and stereo equipment reviewers in the business. It's my privilege to be able to bring him here to talk about what we listen to in our cars.

 

Now, you might think we could better use this space for yet another Jay Leno or Chip Foose story. But it's not an either-or. We still provide all that great stuff for our Baby Boomer car enthusiasts. Camaros, 'Cudas, all of that. I don't take a penny or a moment away from our core traditional coverage. This is something extra, for our big tent of enthusiasts.

 

I appreciate your patience with us -- and if you want MORE of something, I'm the fellow to ask, and I'll work to make sure you're satisfied.

DUB6
Gearhead

@Jack_Hagerty - Here, here, and hip, hip hooray that the Hagerty "tent" also wants to cover many different facets of the lives and passions of its members.  Egyptian Linen Pillowcases and car enthusiasts existences BOTH have many threads...and I'm one who counts music high on the list.  I'm fine with Carini, Foose, and Leno stories - they're usually good reads and tell me something I might no otherwise experience.  But mixing it up, and giving as many views and insights as possible will ensure that this community will have a fully fleshed-out view of itself.

Now, how about an article on the very best flavors of ice cream to cruise to get in our infinitely favorite rides?  🍦🍧🍨😋

MajorTomB
Intermediate Driver

How hard was it to mention Bill Frissell's "Have a Little Faith in Me" and not mention that songs writer, who happens to be pretty darn good, and often overlooked guitarist in his own right, Mr. John Hiatt? 🙂
Fatcat32
Intermediate Driver

In my life music and cars have always gone together. In the early sixties it was hot rods, drag racing and the Beachboys, Jan and Dean, The Rip Chords, The Ventures, and West Coast surf music. Later it was Psycedelic, heavy metal and big convertables. When I got into sports cars, it was progressive jazz and traditional blues. As we mature, music is always in the background, even if our tastes change. The perfect accompanyment to our car hobby.
GSM
Pit Crew

Well said Fatcat32. The Ventures, sports cars, progressive jazz and traditional blues really struck a chord. (You noticed that, right?) For me the lead (snuck that in too) has always been cars and guitars because they have so much in common. They're great to listen to, great to drive/play and great to look at. Lately I've been thinning out the herd but they all brought me loads of happiness along the way.
DUB6
Gearhead

GSM, don't fret over your guitar puns - I'm in tune with ya!

Tinkerah
Technician

I had occasion to experience B.B. King in person (because Eric Johnson, the main draw for me, was one of the opening acts along with Buddy Guy) and he may well have been the most economical guitar player but I wasn't prepared for his big booming voice. A foot away, sometimes even farther from the microphone and he effortlessly belted those lines out loud and clear. Sure, the recordings show his unique tone but hearing him in person struck me in a way that I remember to this day.
TonyT
Instructor

Roy Clark, Flatt and Scruggs, Buddy Guy, Roger Waters, Jerry Jeff Walker, and Glen Campbell are among hundreds if not thousands of guitar virtuosos that are able to elicit any range of emotions depending on the listeners mood. And as music is right there with cars when it comes to subjective appreciation, this topic has no definitive end. Somewhere out there is someone that can pluck a stretched rubber band and make it sound fabulous; they just haven't been discovered yet.
Tsaxman
Detailer

Well, I play guitar, and I comment on here frequently. Because collecting guitars and cars go hand-in-hand in my world, I of course have an opinion, too.

I think Baruth left out the two finest guitar players of my generation, Stevie Ray Vaughn and Eddie Van Halen, because they were in bands and not issuing solo guitar records, so I forgive those omissions (and his leaving out my cousin Rory Gallagher for the same reason). However, ignoring Django Reinhardt is absolutely heretical, if not complete guitar sacrilege. Django's guitar playing influenced every guitar player who came after him, including everyone on Jack's list, and - get this - he did it with only two fingers on his left hand.
Tsaxman
Detailer

Oh, dang, I went back and read the first article, and there was Django.

Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa.

johnmarianmarks
Intermediate Driver

Absolvo te.
BTW, Jack did not write that column or any of the others; he just asked me to do so and he pays me for my work. I'm John; Pleased to Meet You!!!
BTW! Seeing as I was in the last class of Altar Boy prospects who were taught the Ordinary of the Mass in Latin, I want to make sure that everybody knows that there are two famous car-maker names that are Latin, or Latin-based.
A hint--"Ford" ain't one of them. (I heard Gaelic spoken when I was a child, but none of it stuck. Though I doubt that Ford's Irish ancestors spoke Gaelic.)
#1: VOLVO. Volvo's parent company made industrial bearings; so, that punsical name means "I Roll" in Latin. As in, "Revolve."
#2: AUDI. Like many early car entrepreneurs, August Horch had a checkered corporate history. (E.g., Henry Ford's first car company ended up making cars called Cadillac.) Horch fell out with his business partners, but they retained the trademark based on his name. So Horch, whose family name is related to "to hear," by way of "Harken!," decided to name his new company "Audi," as a close-enough Latin equivalent. As in "Auditorium."
Ciao,
jm
OldRoad
Instructor

One live concert recording kills them all. Recorded in 1972 was BB King and Bobby "Blue" Bland Together.
johnmarianmarks
Intermediate Driver

Thanks for the suggestion.

I am pretty sure, though, that "kills them all" is a bit of an overstatement.

At least in part because of the "Apples vs. Pomegranates" aspect of the futility of trying to compare a live Blues album, which by its very nature contains an element of improvisation, with a classical recording in which the focus is on interpretation rather than improvisation.

BTW, I find that Qobuz' auto-suggest function almost always has a very worthwhile album I was previously unaware of. At the moment, I am listening to the Keeshea Pratt Band's "Believe." Very much in the BB King groove!

jm

Zephyr
Instructor

How could you compile a list of great guitar players and leave out Charlie Byrd, possibly the greatest jazz guitarist who ever lived? Byrd and Stan Getz (along with Astrid Gilberto) are pretty much responsible for popularizing Brazilian jazz.
johnmarianmarks
Intermediate Driver

Hi!

If you go back and read the first column in this series:

https://www.hagerty.com/media/opinion/music-for-your-road/music-for-your-road-no-1-some-jazz-records...

You will see that I put "Jazz Samba" on the list of 12 jazz records that are personally significant to me, and which I think that people from all walks of life will benefit from becoming acquainted with.

Perhaps that is the reasons that I unconsciously neglected to include Mr. Byrd in the list of "So Near Yet So Far" guitarists for whom there was not enough space for on this column.

I also want to point out that I don't really think in terms of "greatest" when it comes to music. I don't believe that Beethoven is the "greatest" composer, while I must acknowledge his historical and cultural significance.

I don't think that there is any "greatest" composer. Only personal favorites, arrived at one way or another.

I tend not to write about "Household Name" cultural figures. I'd rather spend my time letting people know about undiscovered treasures.

I don't put Mr. Byrd in the category of Household Name; but, I did give him his due, to the extent I could, in my first Hagerty Media column.

I do think that Byrd is that important; so, to that extent, I do agree with you.

ciao,

john
audiobycarmine
Instructor

BROADCAST ALERT...
"Jazz on a Summer’s Day" is being shown this Saturday, June 19, on TCM. Here on the East coast, it's on at 2:30 PM.