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Leno: Stop believing illogical automotive myths

A few years ago, I was down at the Honda motorcycle dealership and an older guy pulls in riding what appears to be a new Honda, except that it sounded horrible. Also, there was no front fender and no front brake. We got to talking and he told me that front brakes are dangerous, that they’ll send you right over the handlebars, and there was no way he was risking that. Never mind that the front brakes do something like 70 percent of the stopping on a bike. I just nodded...

 

Read the full article on Hagerty.com:

https://www.hagerty.com/media/entertainment/leno-stop-believing-illogical-automotive-myths/

Replies (3)

Replies (3)

I was a mechanic in a past life, and the number of times people would ignore the mechanic and go with whatever their brother-in-law jimbob said used to crack me up. One of my biggest pet peeves is when people add stuff to their oil and then tell me I should do the same. I tell them if it was any good it would already be in the oil, but that usually doesn't go far.

Intermediate Driver

You should own something that's uncommon now, like a Rambler. I've been a Rambler historian since the early 80s, owned one since the summer of 1978. Started researching because there was very easy to find little real info back then. Ended up writing a book on the history of AMC in the early 90s that included some resto info (mostly number decoding). Published a little "fanzine" for about 15 years too. Google "farna rambler" and you'll find me all over the place, so I know my Ramblers. Still have people claiming they were assembled from parts from all other makes, made nothing but bodies themselves. They DID use a handful of parts from others, especially after WWII, but about like most automakers today -- many buy sub assemblies from outside suppliers (often made specifically for them) that are sent to the assembly plant. AMC (company name since 1954, though they used the Rambler brand name exclusively until 1966) used starter/generator/ignition from outside suppliers as well as steering boxes (at least as of the late 50s) and transmissions... and brakes (Bendix or Wagner). Not much else. Engines were built by AMC, though people still claim the 390 V-8 was a Ford and the 232 six was a bored out Chevy 230. They used a total of THREE engines as STOP GAPS until they got there own in 86 years (the 1902 Rambler was the second car to be mass produced in the US -- a year ahead of Ford). The first was the Packard V-8 for two years -- 1955-56 (in the big Nash and Hudson models), then the Audi 2.0L four (though is was assembled by AMC with major castings sent to the US from Germany, smaller parts made over here) in 1977-79, GM 2.5L Iron Duke 1979-83.  If you include Jeep (AMC purchased Jeep in 1970) there will be a few others. That short list DOES NOT include the Buick V-6 -- it was purchased and produced by Kaiser Jeep in the mid 60s so was then a Jeep manufactured engine -- which AMC sold back to GM shortly after buying Jeep. AMC quickly sold off the remaining Buick 350s in 70 (maybe a few into 71), the V-6 and the old F-head four and replaced them with their own straight six and V-8s. The GM 2.8L V-6 was used a few years (84-86), and a Renault turbo-diesel (84-86). Jeep also used the GM 2.5L Iron Duke 79-83. I expect to get some replies with "my dad's/granddad's Rambler definitely had a Ford/Chevy (engine or trans, maybe some other part)" which will most likely be false, unless it's one of the parts I listed. I'm not talking about minor parts like headlight switches and things like that, most bought from outside suppliers even in the 60s, so a "Ford" headlight switch might even be similar to a Chrysler or GM part... could be from the same supplier, though not likely. Most small suppliers couldn't make enough parts to supply two big companies, but they COULD make enough to supply one big one and a smaller one like AMC.

Intermediate Driver

The belief system goes all across the board.  I needed some 10-24 slotted head filister screws for my SU carbs some time ago, and went around town, starting with a bolt company, then a speed shop, and lastly an Ace Hardware store that was practically heaven as far as fasteners are concerned.  I couldn't find the right screws in any length where I could even cut them down. An "associate" approached me and I asked him if they had these screws, and he starts looking all over the "bolt room" and comes up with some 10-32 philips round head screws. I told him that I needed the 10-24 coarse thread screws in the slotted philister head configuration, to which he retorted that 10-24 was fine thread and that 10-32 was the coarse thread. We went back and forth a couple of times, and I finally thought, this is a lost cause and just give it a rest.  Don't know where this guy came from, but his mind was firmly made up and don't try to confuse him with facts.

 

Pit Crew