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Hagerty
Hagerty Employee

How Slow Can You Go: The snail's pace sideshow of old-school car meets

I spent a significant portion of my childhood summers attending classic car shows all over the northeastern United States. Typically arriving in one of my father's late '40s or early '50s Studebakers, we'd park on the field and then begin to wander the grounds of what seemed to me as a child to be an enormous motorized carnival.
https://www.hagerty.com/media/motorsports/how-slow-can-you-go-the-snails-pace-sideshow-of-old-school...
4 REPLIES 4
HASCpres2019
Intermediate Driver

When I first joined an antique car club, slow races were very popular .So were potato spearing contests where the passenger hung out the window with a broom handle equipped with 4 inch spike taped on the end ,trying to "nail" potatoes on the ground. My favorite was the teeter-totter, a specially built car trailer with the wheels removed, onto which you drive your vehicle until it started to tip and you would (hopefully) stop on the balance point. My '46 Chevy one ton pickup was especially good at the first and last events with it's "bull low" gear !
JGeske
Instructor

My dad once did a slow drag in a Scout. 4lo in 1st gear, let out the clutch and take a nap. It was sometimes hard to tell if you were even moving. That thing epitomized the term "crawler gear".
Gary_Bechtold
Specialist

It's basically a slow parade of cars. Sounds like fun for the people who want to see the cars.
TG
Gearhead

I think the changing evolution of 'driveable' has had a lot to do with the demise in interest in a lot of this older iron. I'm not that old, and I had a coworker who would drive his Model T to work. Now if your car can't do 80, corner well, and stop on a dime, it's a road hazard... and if it can't be driven, it makes it a lot harder to enjoy