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How Edelbrock makes its signature aluminum intake manifolds

Edelbrock is one of the best-known speed equipment parts in the business and has been churning out parts in southern California since 1938. That’s when Vic Edelbrock, Sr. first began designing speed parts for the flathead V-8 in his own land-speed racing 1932 Ford.

 

While the company now produces carburetors, water pumps, and superchargers—along with cylinder heads for engines not supported by many aftermarket parts suppliers—Edelbrock's cast-aluminum intakes are, without a doubt, its signature product. If you’ve owned a carbureted car powered by an American V-8 engine, odds are you’ve used an Edelbrock intake manifold or thought about installing one.

 

We were invited to see how Edelbrock turns an ingot of aluminum into an intake manifold. Follow along as we visit two Edelbrock facilities in California to see how it’s done.  Read more: https://www.hagerty.com/media/maintenance-and-tech/how-edelbrock-makes-its-signature-aluminum-intake... 

Replies (15)

Replies (15)

I did a few internships at Edelbrock. This process is very similar for other cast aluminum parts provided. Having all the facilities in-house and foundry nearby is invaluable as a product development engineer, and the gratification of having a made in the USA from start to finish is really something to be proud of especially now days in the automotive industry. Keep up the good work! This is an interesting article I’d like to see Hagerty continue to do “how it’s made” articles on automotive components.

Passenger

I worked in foundry in Brooklyn 40 years ago. We cast aluminum, brass and bronze. The microwave oven was developed during WW2 to quickly dry the sand cores. The old timers told me that's where they got the idea to heat their lunches.  The temperature in the foundry by the blast furnace was over 130 degrees. I remember there was a glass roof that opened up to release the heat. We were given a periodic beer ration because we perspired so profusely. It was probably the only place on earth you were allowed to drink on the job. The City of New York eventually shut down the place because of the EPA. 

Pit Crew

Excellent tour & text, glad there was so many pictures. Nicely done!

Detailer

Made In America!

Passenger

I'm a dedicated Edelbrock fan.  Just replaced the wonky Crossfire fuel injection on my 84 C4 Corvette with an Edelbrock Performer intake and their 1405 600 CFM carb.  Added in a HEI distributor and manual overdrive kit from Monster, and did away with that joke of a computer.  I know from personal experience, that if you ever have any problems with Edelbrock products, their customer service techs are very nice, and know their stuff.  Lots of companies make auto parts, but knowing that Edelbrock's people are just a phonecall away, make me a loyal customer.

Intermediate Driver

Bummer... I was hoping this would include a video of the production process...

😞

New Driver

Thanks for a great story! Let's see more like this.

Passenger

I teach High School Automechanics and loved this! A video would have been better but still a great job. Guess what I and the kids will be doing on Monday. I did some foundry in college and could follow fairly easy so I can explain it to the kids. It is amazing the thought process that has to go into making  a "simple" little part. Thanks to the Author!!! Would love to see MANY more articles like this.

Passenger

Great explanation of the manufacturing process.  Years ago I did some casting and remember the terms cope, drag, sprue hole, etc.

Passenger

What do they do with sand molds? 

New Driver

Well done article... and yes, I too would have liked to see a SHORT video of the process too.

 

I was also astounded to read about the number of steps taken to produce a relatively "simple" part like an intake manifold.  I "assumed" they were sand cast, popped out, drilled and machined.  Done!  

 

Another key learning and thanks for posting

Pit Crew

I agree with the other posters, this was a great article but would really have been super great if it had been presented as a video. Class room instructions are great but hands on and seeing is much better. Keep up the good work!

New Driver

A video would have been nice.

New Driver

Having zero knowledge of metalworking I found this written to a far too high a level for myself to follow. Way too brief with unknown terminology and many assumptions to what your readers know. Keeping in mind I'm a seasoned mechanical engineer with plastic injection molding experience.

New Driver

Link to story? Thx.

Detailer