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Hagerty
Hagerty Employee

Do Mopar's famously wild colors bring more money at auction?

Muscle cars, the darlings of the classic car market of the early 2000s, are front and center once again. Our latest Hagerty Price Guide update has revealed which models and specs are the most sought-after. Many are what you'd expect: Big-blocks bring more, as do convertibles in many cases.
https://www.hagerty.com/media/market-trends/hagerty-insider/do-mopars-famously-wild-colors-bring-mor...
31 REPLIES 31
Canucklehead
Pit Crew

So much Color ! Such a contrast to todays vehicles. Looking down upon a couple dealer lots from an overpass the other day it was a sea of black/grey/white. The odd red vehicle could be seen, maybe a blue one. Sad to see, it looked lifeless. I believe that if you built them (colourful colors) they will come (and buy those beautiful hues). I’ve read manufactures state that black/grey/white are what folks want. Bull.
Snailish
Instructor

Canada & USA do it different than other parts of the world. Colour is the obvious way you notice it, but it is actually all aspects of models/trim/options.

 

We get dealers to fill their lots with product they have to sell.

 

They are cowards and fill the lot with "safe" sells.

 

They heavily incentivize sales to get us to buy not-quite-what-we-want.

 

Meanwhile other parts of the world report people buying colours other than grey/white/black/silver/charcoal

 

*I did read an article recently suggesting that NA consumers may be adapting to having to wait for their new vehicle (due to the various supply chain issues) to the point that we are ready to pay for what we want and not need a full lot of discounted compromises.

RJ
Detailer

I suspect it comes down to giving people less choice speeds things up for the dealer. It may be a case of "No way in the world would I drive that" vs "I guess I could live with that".
tonyjustin
Pit Crew

Hundred percent agree. I tell people that cars are now only come in colors of pavement. Black, white, or some shade in between. I refuse to own a pavement colored car.
RG440
Instructor

Not to mention the twenty year run of grey interiors in everything built. That’s what folks want is bunk! It all boils down to what the bean counters want. Grey is well….Grey.
turbobill
Intermediate Driver

For 50 plus grand you can buy something that looks like everyone elses!
27340
Pit Crew

My '72 'Cuda is Y2/V1F. That would be sunfire yellow with dark green vinyl roof. I've only ever seen one other Barracuda with this color combo. I've only seen two other Plymouths with sunfire yellow in person, period.

It makes for a nice looking car, but I doubt the value of mine would be worth any more without some special provenance to bring the dollars. It doesn't really matter though, as it's not for sale.
Snailish
Instructor

How many of the sales are the same purple hemi convertible?

Not accounting for survivor original paint, correct respray and non-correct respray kind of puts smoke over this data analysis to me.

I think you have to slice this way thinner... only look at one year, one model at a time. Maybe the same trends hold true for all 68-70 chargers, but maybe not. I know first gen Camaros had different production distribution of colours across the three years, including not all colours being in all 3 years.

Plus there could be something that the same high-impact colour hurts the value.
Patrician
Detailer

When dealing with collector cars COLOR IS ALMOST EVERYTHING. A wisteria 1957 Thunderbird will bring more money than any other color for that model. When it comes to color the 1955 Studebaker Speedster in lemon and lime has to be the king. My 1956 Golden Hawk in pink and white stands out like jewel.
PaulRed55
New Driver

What about the "Petty" Blue colored cars - didn't they offer the Richard Petty Blue during the late 60's and early 70's
Buzz
Detailer

It’s up there C37D Corporate Blue/Petty Blue
gergeizzo
Pit Crew

WOW! What a selection! Yet I was always interested more in the options the car had over the color yet it makes sense it can increase the price tag. My only suggestion is keep the color the car came with. I always wanted my Dart to be yellow yet when I did repaint the car I put it back to the original FK5. I am glad I made that decision especially finding out later that only 4% of 1970 340 Dart's were painted in that color.
srh563
Pit Crew

I've never seen a Dart in FK5 except on the internet.  My Challenger is GK6 which is darker.  If I want a different color , I'll buy an additional car.

Hodag
Pit Crew

Well my TorRed Scat Pack for the year is low but your chart says it is popular. UGH!
RG440
Instructor

YES !, YES ! & YES ! … And I haven’t even read the article yet ! Now to the article…
topside
Advanced Driver

Citron/Curious is indeed "hot" right now, and relatively rare. Rarity of course doesn't always equate to desirability, witness Y3, which is a slightly warmer shade than Y2. Generally, yes, the High Impact colors tend to bring a premium, but for most Mopar collectors, a color-change is not desirable. Black and Orange are prized, as well. Side note: the E, F, G etc prefixes denote the model year that color was introduced (E=1969, F=1970, etc), but Chrysler was pretty casual and inconsistent with some coding, such as Y2 for example. Some colors carried over from '68 with new codes, but most were new. Oddly to me, most folks call EVERY metallic blue "B5" - wish I had a dollar for everyone doing that to my Q1 Electric Blue '68 Road Runner. What I find amusing is how many various shades of green Mopars were on the street in '68 and '69, yet a lot of folks don't care for those colors now. But that's OK: I don't care for brown colors on cars, yet other people love them.
PCL
Pit Crew

I was amused by being reminded of "Curious Yellow". How many of us are old enough to recall the notorious Swedish sex film of that period that inspired the name of the paint - "I am Curious: Yellow" ?

Peter
Buzz
Detailer

It’s a bit crazy but Dodge built more 1970 Super Bees in FC7 Plum Crazy purple metallic than any other color by double! It was very popular. Another fun fact, GY3 Curious Yellow was named after a the porn movie “I Am Curious Yellow”. That movie had a sequel called “I Am Curious Blue”, but Chrysler Corp failed to name a paint color after it. Rumor has it that one name for purple metallic that fell from the list of possible names was Statutory Grape.
Gary_Bechtold
Specialist

Yellow would not be my first pick nor a premium color to me. However if the car I wanted was only available in yellow I would not say No.
FloridaMarty
Advanced Driver

Bright colors, yes please! When and where did car colors go away. A car lot today looks like a b/w picture. Black, gray (silver), white. Those so called colors aren't colors, they are tints. Meh!

74firebird
Pit Crew

the gray ,black white are cheap, red costs $500.00 a pint. and silver metallic you can paint a whole car with a quart. fog it on and clear it. the trick to matching new cars is fog on a tiny bit of paint it looks light until you clear it, then it matches perfectly.
RG440
Instructor

You need to visit your local Dodge dealer…As always they get the color thing and you can get your Hemi in your color or just your vehicle in your color. Great article with fun options !
Mr6Pack
New Driver

Owning a classic car has been a learning experience to say the least! My 1972 Dodge Charger fender tag states the color is TB3, which I have found no reference to. The car was repainted FC7 by the previous owner and wears the Plum Crazy well! I have been told the TB3 is Petty Blue, which makes sense because the original interior is designated B5, but is now black buckets with white inserts. Current color scheme works well but far from stock.
TheMartian
Pit Crew

I believe a change to an optional for the same year of production is generally acceptable. When I restored my '66 Thunderbird convertible, the original Mellon Yellow, my kids called it baby poop gold, was not an option. However, the Diamond Blue, a '66 option for TBirds and Lincolns, made the black top and interior stand out wonderfully. The car, in Wisconsin now, appeared white in bright light and very light blue in the evening light. When I sold her after 20 years, the first person to see her took.her far from Maryland. COLOR matters!
MrKnowItAll
Advanced Driver

Colors, and popularity, are cyclic and faddish. An anecdotal study.

Browns and tans tend to make a car disappear into the pavement- though dark greens and "root beer browns were quite in style in the late '60's.

Plum Crazy Mopars were dubbed "Purple Peelers" when new- the paint was defective. They were repainted under warranty, iirc.
SLAVENDER
Intermediate Driver

If the Mach E I have on order came in that Charger pink I’d order it.
turbobill
Intermediate Driver

If only they'd offer more than the same five boring colors today..........
RBHatton
Pit Crew

I can remember going to dealers in the 60's and 70's and seeing color selection sheets which listed dozens of available colors, and many interior choices. These were prevalent in all American makes and models, and the dealer encouraged you to order exactly what you wanted. Now, 90% of American cars are in one of four colors, and interiors are black or grey, with a very rare tan showing up now and then. The excitement is diminishing, along with the gasoline engine.
srh563
Pit Crew

Mine is a original K6 color.  Its worth less but blended in more so less speeding tickets over the 50 years. 

I've had it since new so value of what I can sell it for is not too important. 

Snailish
Instructor

Is it the color you like?  That's all that should matter.

 

SJ
Technician

Another interesting article, amazing how you keep them coming.