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Hagerty
Hagerty Employee

Could this barn-find Lincoln Continental become the next six-figure sweetheart?

The 1961 through '69 Lincoln Continental has entered territory not often populated by the likes of American luxury sedans: the realm of the seriously valuable, highly collectible classic. As discussed in our Buyer's Guide, a shockingly large number of younger folks are interested in Ford's mid-century flagship, and pristine examples fetch top dollar.
https://www.hagerty.com/media/buying-and-selling/could-this-barn-find-lincoln-continental-become-the...
87 REPLIES 87
Roxton
Pit Crew

Just saw this on Barn Finds yesterday. It's going to take some deep pockets and some love to ever bring this one back. Great motor in these though!
OldFordMan
Advanced Driver

Better to part it out and make good money selling to restorers!
Gene_M
Detailer

BIG mistake!
Bobby_Q
New Driver

Gene, I agree.
There are so few of these anyway. Agreed, it will take a ton of work and attention, not to mention money, but it's so cool.
mchalewj
Intermediate Driver

Did they find this at the Douglas farm in Hooterville?

LamboEd
Detailer

LOL, that is great! It was probably Lisa;s car!
Ajakeski
Detailer

Oliver bought it from Mr. Haney. It was Arnold's favorite car.
Uncle_Doug
Pit Crew

Arnold Ziffle is the name on the title 😉
Bobby_Q
New Driver

It's too old to be the one the guy on Green Acres had!!! Hahahahaha! His was quite lovely though.
Jimincalif
Intermediate Driver

After looking at the pictures and all that is needed to restore it I say it is only good as a parts car.
Gene_M
Detailer

BIG mistake
Thrillseeker
Intermediate Driver

That old girl is rough. I can still see potential, but I wouldn't give much for her since she would cost a pretty penny to restore or restomod.
OHCOddball
Advanced Driver

Six figure sweetheart? It will take six figures tho restore it! It IS rare.
Ajakeski
Detailer

Someone will over-pay for it.
Bigcat75
Pit Crew

I saw this on Barn Finds too, you should give credit where credit is due. Don’t crib their notes and act like you found it yourselves.
Sajeev
Community Manager

Article amended to give credit where credit is due. Thanks for that. 

Daniel
Intermediate Driver

Looks like the barn didn't have a roof!
wolfmanwooley
New Driver

Given the cost of restoration items (over 5K for weather stripping alone) and the time it would take to do a proper restoration, I say buy a finished example and enjoy it now as prices continue to escalate.

motolargo
Intermediate Driver

This could be the perfect example of how to spend $100k to build a $60k car. If it was my car, I would see if it runs then wash it, fit new tires, rebuild the brakes throw a blanket over the seats and drive it on sunny days. If it is not a runner with a bit of minor work, then it might be best to push it back in the barn and let someone else find it.
TinaBird
Intermediate Driver

I agree! I enjoy cars that still show evidence of the journey they've been through. A restoration takes away all that hard earned character and its true, real patina. Now there are exceptions, in my opinion, to this when it comes to collision damage and major structural rust issues.
Uncle_Doug
Pit Crew

Does this "barn" have a roof? What an ungodly mess. I'm always amused when people allow cars to deteriorate horribly......then expect top dollar when the hulk is offered for sale. IMHO this would cost way more to restore than it would ever be worth.
Tim
Technician

Now I understand both sides of the resto-mod argument. I've often enjoyed well-executed resto-mod projects seen at auctions and elsewhere. As long as the end result was good, I haven't been bothered by the idea of modifying the original.

However, it feels blasphemous to resto-mod such a work of art. I don't think it's a matter of being a Lincoln Continental lover, though that certainly adds to my feelings. Rather, I think that there are certain cars that were designed so well and are so iconic that they shouldn't get resto-mod plastic surgery. I believe the early '60s Continentals fall into this category. I may allow you to hack into the later '60s models, however. 😄
OldCarMan
Instructor

Really??
It is a dam car, albeit somewhat rare. When I see some stupid Mustang going for $300k on Mecom, and workaday Vettes hitting $75-$100k why not? A '41 Packard limo, a 100 pt. old restoration went for only $75k, who's to say what's blasphemous? Arguably this is much more a seldom to be found artifact, compared to '60s anything.
This all sounds like the old restorer epithet about those lousy hot rodders, butchering up their beloved Models As and 32 Fords. So how did THAT work out?
50s60s70s
Intermediate Driver

For the folks weighing the value of the car value the restoration cost, stick to buying and selling rolling art that's the fruit of someone's else's labor.
I have put way more time and money into bringing a car back from the dead that many said wasn't worth the scrap weight only to have the market catch up after my car has been finished. And I still enjoy them! Haven't sold a one.
elldorado2000
Detailer

Give it a good power washing and then see if she runs. Why does it need to be totally restored? Get it running, make sure the mechanicals are up to snuff and drive it. Patina is worth something.
OldFordMan
Advanced Driver

I saw this very car in the 80's on tv: DALLAS
79vette
New Driver

I had a ‘67 in 1979 that I bought for $700. I suppose now I should have kept it. Even then parts were impossible to find, especially for that big 462 motor. But it was fun to drive, especially for a lead footed teenager.
Javman
Intermediate Driver

I had a 65 back in early 80's that I bought for $500 cdn. and drove the crap out of it. Could pile a bunch of buds in it for a night of racaus bar hopping ( it was the 80's ). Needed lots of friends to kick in for the gas as was lucky to get 10mpg out of the tired old girl. One night me and the buds used @20 black spray bombs to spruce her up to use as a friends wedding car the next day. A bunch of strategically placed flowers on the tacky paint and she looked like a million bucks.😂 When she wouldn't go anymore I trade her to a relative for a chain saw. Oh to be young again
MAXTHEAX
Intermediate Driver

YIKES!!!!
That is a labour of love. A love that will empty your pockets.
richreolee
Pit Crew

Contact the Classic Car Club of America and Gilmore Museum for the true answers to the love of cars. It will change a lot of what you may know. I did restoration for 40 odd years and loved it. It is not about the money but the love of special cars. If it was the money Rich would be rich today.
Sherman and I had 72 cars and 28 motorcycles til we got too old to have fun anymore.
hearsedriver
Detailer

sir, you only get too old when they toss the dirt on top of you, go out there and have some fun!
richreolee
Pit Crew

I had a 1962, 1963, and 1966. They are a sweet car to own and drive. The 1966 went to Gilmore museum in Michigan back in 2003. It will be nice to see this one after someone has the love to restore it. Thanks for posting the find.
MATTMERICA
Technician

This heap is a real mess, part it out and move on. If it wasn't even stored with the top down, what does that tell you?
Charlie
Intermediate Driver

Those were really great cars in their day, and I always wanted one but couldn't ever afford one. It is truly a shame that this one was let go to junk status!
Gary_Bechtold
Specialist

If it was in better condition I would expect some big money. Looking as trashed as this I don't know. Parts car to me.
steveadil
Pit Crew

I believe the ‘65 that went for $330,000 was restored by my friend Rich Liana. He exclusively restores 60’s Continentals and is one of the best in the world. At the auction they mentioned that he was the restorer.

I got him his first resto job on a ‘66 convertible and he restored my ‘67 sedan.

Bostwick9
Advanced Driver

The 65 is my favorite of the 61-65 series. The extra detailing in the tail lights, grille "power dome" and new turn signals in the fender corners.... just the right amount of "face lifting".
HotRodGTO
Intermediate Driver

Looks like most of the parts are there. Get it running and enjoy driving it!
Redenzo
Intermediate Driver

The cost of a true concourse quality restoration is sure to hit north of $80k so even if you get it cheap you are better off buying a fully done example even without considering the issue of time- both as to the "getting it running" time and the invariable delays in the restoration process- spending all of the money (admittedly in dribs and drabs) and getting the car done in about 24-36 months down the road (if you are lucky and the shop does not mess you up as to the schedule or worse yet simply does a bad job so you have to redo a lot- neither of which is unknown in the industry) does not seem a wise move. If you were going to restomod route then maybe- but its a unitbody car and so now you are going to an aftermarket frame and likely north of $125k to do the project once you add that bad-ass LS, 6 pistons in the front and 4 in the rear, a full fuel system and on and on.... Having "been there and done that" in my own opinion its always better to buy the cleanest and best example of a car you want and that you can afford (with a PPI to make sure its correct) rather than a never ending project- just my 2 cents
82cbxbmw
New Driver

watch Jay Leno's guy "fix" his 66 Convertable top. Dad had a 69 great car! That one's not.
avideo
Detailer

A few years ago at Hot August Nights in Reno; my 1966 Corvette convertible was parked next to a pair of restored Lincoln slab sided restorations. From talking I found out that both cars had been restored by one of the owners. He then went on explain that finding missing parts was a huge problem for these cars; and that in some cases parts need to be machined from drawings or pictures in parts manuals.
JAG
Detailer

I have a 67 (last year) in my barn. Ever work on the power steering on these Lincolns? Bad design. It leaks 6 trans fluid like a blood trail ever spring when it start up. Getting the top to work is a crap shoot. But in the end it does start ever time and people just love the car.
61Rampy
Instructor

Fun Fact: Those Lincolns used a hydraulic wiper motor, fed from the power steering pump, which was itself located ON the crankshaft, and bolted to the timing cover, behind the harmonic balancer. Mid 60's T-Birds used the same setup.
Reinhold_Weege
Instructor

I hate to be "that guy" who asks an unrelated question, but has Hagerty let its security certificates lapse? I would really like to see pics of this Lincoln, but this has been my typical Hagerty page experience for a few weeks now.

 

Reinhold_Weege_0-1642100306655.png

 

Stixx
Detailer

might want to get Jay Leno's take on this one . Im betting six figures would barely get you there to the point of bringing that price at auction. This car is only worth restoring if you really want one and have a hundred grand to restore it . Someone who could do most of the work himself might be able to do it for that. jusayin
OldCarMan
Instructor

Really?
Jay has good PR, but is far from an expert. Even that Carini guy or the Pringle guy are far from experts despite the hype. So do tell, what have you restored? Did you sell it or keep it? People are paying heavy 6 figures to build cars that are out of their weight class. So?
65sportfury
Pit Crew

This is an overpriced POS parts car at best, assuming there is anything usable to salvage to use on another car. Who knows about the floors and frame after it has sat on the ground that long. The engine may be seized, the block could be cracked, etc. Why does Hagerty continue to glorify obvious disasters as if their golden treasures?
Patrician
Detailer

I have a 1957 Lincoln Premiere convertible, a 1960 Lincoln Continental MarkV convertible, a 1965,1966 and 1967 Lincoln 4 door convertibles. All garaged in beautiful condition. Should I quit my job? I really don't think so. When I see these cars go for six figures then I'll believe it. Lincolns were produced in such small numbers compared to Cadillac parts are becoming scarcer and scarcer.. This is no 67 Camaro where you open up a catalogue and can build a car. Every time I got a chance to buy a parts car I did. Stripped them to the bone. I have a ton of parts. Especially top parts. Anyone trying to restore that wreck in the barn will spend at least $100,000 preying the unibody isn't collapsed.
65sportfury
Pit Crew

This a just a POS parts car at best. Why anybody could think it be would be a viable restoration candidate is beyond me. It likely has rotten floors, frame rails, a seized engine, etc. Hagerty shouldn't waste good time and space pushing this as even considered as restorable. Must be a slow news week.