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Hagerty Employee

Brother from another mother: 11 shared engine displacements

Today it’s common to find engines from several manufacturers that share displacement figures. Engineers determined that 500 cc per cylinder is a sweet spot for efficiency with low emissions and, consequently, there are lots of 2.0-liter four-cylinders, 3.0-liter sixes, and 4.0-liter V-8s. Before that discovery, road taxes in some countries also influenced displacement. Plenty of manufacturers ended up with engines designed to fit under certain mandated thresholds. Read the full article on Hagerty.com:

 

https://www.hagerty.com/media/automotive-history/brother-from-another-mother-11-shared-engine-displa...

161 REPLIES 161
Passenger

How about the 389 Pontiac GTO's power plant

Passenger

Excellent article.  Of course, the nit pickers will descend, including me.  What happened to the Buick 425 nail head sitting in my Riviera?

New Driver

Hold yer' horses ... what about Pontiac's 400?

Passenger

Would have like to hear about the 455SD engine in this listing.

Passenger

I understood that the Mopar 360 was the same big block as the 383, etc. The common 318 was the small block that could be had inas much as a 361 cu. in. version.

Passenger

As some have said, Chevy 383 was not a production engine displacement. Also, Edsel used a 361 in 1958.

Pit Crew

In the 1950s, the first "B" block MOPAR engine was a 350.

New Driver

The first B Mopar block appeared in the 1958 Plymouth Fury at 350 CID

Passenger

Nope, the 360 was an LA small block, more like a stroked 340, but it replaced usage of the 383 in (at least) some cars.

Passenger

The 383 was an option on 1967-69 Darts (GTS).  I think Mopar when I hear 383, too.  Maybe 383 is a Chevy thing in the drag racing crowd, but I never heard of it before.