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Austin-Healey project car: diagnosing problems | Kyle's Garage - Ep 12

 

When a friend called and asked if I wanted to buy his Austin Healey Sprite, I politely declined, citing my bank account balance—which was darn close to not having a comma in it. I had told my fiancee that I was going to start saving again and attempt to re-balance the books with two project cars in the garage already. Then my friend told me the price, and my sweetheart called the car "cute." Yup, I had to have it.

 

Read the full story on Hagerty.com:

https://www.hagerty.com/media/videos/austin-healey-project-car-diagnosing-problems-kyles-garage-ep12...

Replies (9)

Replies (9)

Wear your seat belt, or put one in, so your little tin can doesn't become a coffin.

New Driver

A little disclaimer about my previous comment. I suspect that the reason you are bleeding the brakes is a soft or low brake pedal. In the past generally when there was a problem with these brakes it was corrosion caused in part by the highly hygroscopic mineral oil based Girling or Lucas brake fluid or the mixing of incompatible brake fluids. Now the disclaimer: If you replace the brake fluid it should be with the same type that is being replaced i.e. mineral based or glycol based or synthetic or silicone based. Even if all the existing brake fluid is evacuated  there will be small pockets or amounts retained in the system that will contaminate your new fluid. If you change to a different type than what was already there or you discover that what is there was contaminated to begin with the whole system will need to be rebuilt. 

Pit Crew

Another Kyle here:  Having owned several British sports cars, I'm going to lay odds that the either or both the clutch master cylinder and slave cylinder may be in need of rebuilding.  I have had to clean and polish both cylinders on a couple of these little beasts to get the clutch to disengage properly.

 

Looking forward to seeing what you come up with, especially seeing the condition of that rear brake bleeder screw.

Passenger

Kyle that bleeder screw is nasty. Looks like you have some work ahead of you. Corrosion is evident. Your Sprite has Girling Brakes and requires Girling compatible brake fluid. It is DOT 5.1. I would recommend not just a brake bleed but a brake fluid flush and full replacement. The brakes on these cars are actually pretty good and quite reliable if serviced properly. In the past often times owners not realizing the difference in fluid types either mixed incorrect fluid into the system or replaced it with the wrong stuff. The brakes failed or do not perform properly. Next after you do the flush and replacement you might experience possible wheel cylinder leaks or caliper leaks because the rubber components had deteriorated. Your proper maintenance having disturbed all the accumulated goop in the system allowing brake fluid to penetrate corroded sealing areas attached to compromised rubber. Good luck on your project it is a fun little car. I enjoy seeing you work on it. By the way the engine actually evolved from the Austin Mini Cooper S engine. It was detuned and put into the Midget/Sprite. In Cooper tune it would have been faster than its big brother MGB and US smog requirements would have been also  tough to follow.

Pit Crew

Thanks for the video Kyle.  Good luck!!

Passenger

Great video.  Having struggled thru a clutch bleed on an Alfa Romeo, I'd like to see how you solved it. Hope you have another video.

Passenger

Excellent detail on addressing your clutch issue.   Thanks 

Passenger

Kyle, I'm watching episode 16. You do not have a comment line for this video. Confused why you torqued "looks like" M8 bolt over 30 lbs. If you couldn't find spec online (that is online) why wouldn't you check size and torque the bolt that way. Using the flywheel bolt as your reference M12 was not a good choice.

Passenger

Kyle:  I really enjoy your videos. Keep up the great work.

New Driver