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Hagerty
Hagerty Employee

According To You: 10 automotive factoids you should never forget

As time progresses, every industry has a way of innovating in hopes of advancing our way of living. These are not always huge leaps, and we tend to forget the smaller innovations in favor of the big ones.
https://www.hagerty.com/media/hagerty-community/according-to-you-10-automotive-factoids-you-should-n...
88 REPLIES 88
jrzybob442
Pit Crew

OK your first A/C "factoid" is incorrect. A/C was offered from 1939 on (in the trunk) in all brands, makes and models - However, the first under-dash unit was offered by AMC in 1954, based upon Nash-Kelvinator designs. GM did not offer the under dash units until 1956, (in Cadillac first) when Nash allowed others to utilize their design. Lincoln followed in 1957.
JackVan
Detailer

When the govm't first instituted the "Shed Test" to monitor fuel system emissions, no car could pass it. After several cars were moved from the assembly line without being fueled, they still failed. The EPA would not listen and continued to assess fines until courts started to get involved. That new car smell and all the paint drying were the problem.
GC
Intermediate Driver

Lots of interesting factoids, but we mostly have no proof for a lot of the "facts" other than the poster's word for it. Makes for interesting conversation, for sure, but maybe you should have asked for some kind of verification or confirmation ahead of time before presenting them as facts. Just my humble opinion 😁
DUB6
Specialist

All of these gotta be true - I just read them on the internet!  😄

Tinkerah
Engineer

Isn't every seat belt tongue with a square hole an effective bottle opener? It's worth trying just for the increased irony.
DUB6
Specialist

I've always thought so, but it probably should be thoroughly tested out to prove or disprove.  My advice: pull over before unbuckling your belt to open the bottle.

Tinkerah
Engineer

Idling at a stop light counts as "pulled over" right?  😁

DUB6
Specialist

If my observations of drivers checking their smartphones is any indication, it would seem so, yes.  However, @Tinkerah, as I often point out in my posts, on this site we are telling our insurance carrier what we're up to (and probably the premium-rate adjuster people), so I advise discretion!  😋

Tinkerah
Engineer

Ooh good point DUB6 - So...of course my flippant comments are intended as comedy. Yeah, that's it. As unfunny as they may be they are meant as COMEDY, not a driving habit. (Whew, close one....)

JBBearcat
Advanced Driver

My ironic favorite...
Cadillac and Lincoln were both started by the same man...Henry Leland.
Afineghibli
Pit Crew

See my response an hr prior to yours. I'm in on it. Good on you!
It truly is an interesting history in the early days of the automobile. And both Brands exist to this day albeit back when they were 2200 brands.
GroovyD
New Driver

Interesting piece, although the headline features the incorrect use of the word "factoid." It's a common misnomer that a factoid is a small fact. The word actually means something commonly thought to be true that is, in fact, false.
CLS180MPH
New Driver

MERRIAM WEBSTER
factoid noun
fac·toid | \ ˈfak-ˌtȯid \
Definition of factoid
2: a briefly stated and usually trivial fact
Snailish
Engineer

That's an interesting factoid.
Afineghibli
Pit Crew

Not so groovy in this string.......
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ArmyVet
Pit Crew

My 1982 Mercury Capri RS 5.0 had a serpentine belt. And to add a further mystique to this car. haha. The 302 was supposedly a Marine Engine. The dash board tach had no redline markings on it. But it did end at 6000. I asked the Service Manager at the dealership where I bought it, what is the REDLINE. I needed to know. He said: "no red line it is a Marine Engine" Hmmm........I sent a request to Mercury. They replied: "6000 RPM is the red line. I still have the letter. The speedometer ended at 85 MPH. But, if you removed the little pegs it would keep registering. Un-calibrated reading, I had it up to 130 MPH. Fun little car. I kept it for over 30 years.
ArmyVet
Pit Crew

Oops That is 20 years.
Padgett
Advanced Driver

My V8 Sunbird had the 85 speedo (I liked them, easy to read and above 85 am watching other gauges anyway) had no pegs. In long autocrosses it often pointed past straight down and nearong "0".
Miketheump
Intermediate Driver

And auto A/C having the names of the three inventors forever etched into car history, Norm, Max and Hi. It's in every vehicle, 🙂
Snailish
Engineer

reading your post I picture Moe, Larry and Curly introducing themselves as the inventors of A/C.

Well done.
MoparMarq
Advanced Driver

So I suppose a name for your crew cab dually 4WD GMC truck (if you're into naming your vehicles) could be..."The Big Grabowski"?
Ragtop69
Detailer

As a dedicated car enthusiast, I have no idea what this article was about. Deadline pressure?
Sajeev
Community Manager

It's about promoting our Community, the people that contribute, and to a lesser extent the moderator (i.e. people like me). JOIN US!!! 

Rider79
Technician

Our 1984 Mustang GT 5.0, built in September 1983, has the serpentine belt. Perhaps they only discontinued the belt a short time, then? Regardless, it was a big step forward in making belt changes easier and quicker.
Javelinsrule
Pit Crew

I was told that "G.M.C. meant "Got Mechanic Coming".
No offense guys; just a joke that my friend a Chevy lover told me.
AMCs rule.
Swamibob
Technician

Oooooh... AMC = Ain't My Car. 🙂 Told to me by another guy whose family had a lot of AMC's while he was growing up.
5alive
New Driver

When I worked at Ford as a young man, I was told the the seatbelt buckle of all Fords was the perfect bottle opener. I walked over to a brand new Ford Probe and grabbed the seat belt and tried to open a bottle. Didn’t work. I was told by the other Ford employees that the Probe was not really a Ford.
MattO
New Driver

You missed any BMW E30 door post hardware as the perfect beer bottle opener.
Bubberz1
Intermediate Driver

Barbara Mandrell was instrumental in seat belt laws. "Mandrell to sing out support for seat belt laws" by Daniel Egler, Tim Franklin and The Chicago Tribune, May 6,1985.
hyperv6
Racer

This is about trucks. 

Goodyear tire developed the first pneumatic tires for trucks and used them on a series of delivery trucks to deliver tires at first from Akron to to. Boston. Then Boston to San Francisco. 

Next they developed the first tandem rear axle and added Pneumatic  tires for the early cross country trips. 

This was the start of cross country trucking.

 

My Great Uncle started here left for the Six Wheel Bus company than moved to GMC when they bought out the bus company. 

trickytrick
Intermediate Driver

Bet ya didn’t know Henry Ford started Cadillac. At least that’s the word in Detroit
Robert_A
Pit Crew

Trickytrick: That's BS!

The true story is that in the mid 1890s through to the early 1900s, Henry Ford started three companies, all of which quickly went bankrupt, before starting the Ford Motor Company, in 1903. Ford's third company, the Henry Ford Co. made decent cars but went bankrupt and was sold to Henry Leland, another Detroit automotive engineer of that era, who wanted to continue making cars, much to the irritation of Henry Ford.

Leland did not or could not use the Ford name, so he fired Henry Ford and changed the name of Ford's bankrupt company to honor the founder of the city of Detroit, in 1701, a neer-do-well French explorer, commissioned by the King of France, by the name of Antoine De La Mothe Cadillac. So, the Henry Ford Company was renamed the Cadillac Motor Car Company, and was run for several years by Henry Leland, who turned Ford's vehicles into luxury vehicles.

Cadillac was purchased by William Crapo Durant, the General Motors chairman, during that era, when GM was acquiring many other car makers. Following the acquisition of Cadillac by GM, Henry Leland left Cadillac to start a new company to make airplane engines for the U.S. Army's Air Force during the World War I years.

Leland named his new company to honor the 16th president of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, who Leland greatly respected and revered. The new Lincoln Motor Company made superb, highly engineered airplane engines. But after the war's end in 1918, production fell dramatically, as the Army was no longer buying large quantities of airplanes. Leland wanted to keep his business going, so he decided to return to making premium automobiles, as he did in his Cadillac years, and began production of the Lincoln automobile, as a worth competitor to crosstown rivals Cadillac and Packard, in the early 1920s. But competition was very fierce in the luxury car market, and Lincoln Motor Company began losing money after several years, and eventually went into it's own bankruptcy.

Henry Ford, who was, by then the world's largest car maker, and one of the world's richest men, saw the Lincoln bankruptcy as an opportunity to get revenge on Henry Leland for stealing the Henry Ford Company away from him, and, in a "what goes around, comes around" scenario, scooped up Lincoln to enter the luxury market. Henry Ford then fired Henry Leland, and Leland's son Wilfred, and installed his own son, Edsel Ford, as the new president of Lincoln.

Gary_Bechtold
Specialist

Grabowsky Motor Company? Sounds like he played tight end on 'Da Chicago Bears. Ditka would be proud.
Swamibob
Technician

Da Bears!
brouggly
Pit Crew

Fun facts! You'll probably be able to see my wife's "eye rolls" from the moon when I start spouting them. My gear head grandson will love it though!
DUB6
Specialist

Women not only have practical minds, but they also possess amazing eye rolling abilities.  Wives of gearhead guys typically develop these skills to top-notch levels.  After 50 years of marriage, Mrs. DUB6 is Olympic class...  🙄

SlowJoeCrow
Intermediate Driver

I think the last F head engine standing was actually the Rover P3 in six cylinder form. This engine was introduced as a four in 1948 and was also used in the Series I Land Rover. It was subsequently extended to six cylinders and used in the P4 and P5 cars and in 1967 a low compression 2.6 liter version was offered on the Series IIa 109 and was also available on the Series III 109 until 1977 or 78 when it was replaced by the V8 model
KwikDraw
Intermediate Driver

The lore in my family is that I have a great grandfather or maybe great great grandfather that invented turn signals. Supposedly he had a mock up of his system on a piece of wood in his attic. I never saw it. I was a small child when he died, and the house was sold and long gone before I was of an age to be interested in trying to find it. I am not claiming that his actual version of turn signals is what ended up on cars. He had no connection to the car industry and so he never got it to the right people for it to actually be the source for turn signals that were actually first put on cars.
DUB6
Specialist

Well, ya never know!  🤔