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Hagerty
Hagerty Employee

7 ways to ensure you won't get scammed when buying a car

The gang at Hagerty Media occasionally interacts with our readers outside of this website's comments section, be it at the Lounge in the Hagerty Community, or in an email/phone call behind the scenes.
https://www.hagerty.com/media/buying-and-selling/7-ways-to-ensure-you-wont-get-scammed-when-buying-a...
102 REPLIES 102
MeJ
Advanced Driver

Last year I was shopping for a decent winter car after I sold my Corvette and had this happen. A friend sent me Facebook Marketplace ad showing a very nice early-aughts Accord for what seemed like a great price. Until...
Yep, they were stationed in some army base over seas, but don't worry, just deposit the money, and once you have it will be shipped to directly and you can return it if you don't like it...etc...etc. I laughed and showed my wife who also laughed.
I'm just surprised some people actually fall for this crap. As far as I'm concerned, if I can't see it or touch it, the car doesn't exist.
Sajeev
Community Manager

People are too trusting, that's the problem. 

Tim
Technician

I think it's because people are greedy. They like the idea of getting a great deal. I'd bet if these "cars" were priced close to fair asking price that no one would jump. But the thought of getting a great deal for only a "little work" is too tempting to P.T. Barnum's customers.
EventHorizons
Intermediate Driver

This is it.
There is a saying out there somewhere to the effect of "You can't cheat an honest man!" Not 100% true but you get the idea.
Sajeev
Community Manager

That's a very valid point, although I don't know if looking for a good deal online constitutes greed by my standards. 

MustangJim
Technician

Chasing a good deal is not greedy. But in this day and age you need to read the flags automaticaly and not give it a second thought. Someone asks for money to be help in escrow, or any upfront charges is the end of any corrospondence.
il66pony
Pit Crew

Which equates to stupid
TG
Technician

I think that the problem with scams is that they are cheap to run and probably only need to be successful in 1 case in 1000 or 10000 in order to be profitable. There is always going to be that one person who never heard of the nigerian prince or just plain had a moment of weakness
JGMan
Intermediate Driver

Sajeev,

What's with the article having strikethrough text still visible about Carvana title issues?  Is that a hint that although they are supposedly a "legit" national, company, that the same issue plague their sales being 100% online?  I recently was looking at a 2021 Jeep on Vroom, a big online car sales company that's been in existence for 7 years.  Vroom has been around about the same amount of time as Carvana but unlike Carvana, Vroom is not registered with the BBB. When I saw my very first Carvana commercial I had a good laugh.  I told my wife, you can't and shouldn't want to try to buy a car completely online! The giant vending machines and their funny-looking wheel cover-clad trucks made it seem even more surreal - and even funnier .  Well, the desperation of recent supply chain issues, compounded by the pandemic almost made me change my thinking (I have underlying respiratory issues from 9/11) and I started a conversation with Vroom about a "too good to be true" Jeep allegedly located in my home state. But I couldn't see or inspect it - they just want deposits, payment and guarantee your happiness upon delivery on their terms.  When I checked BBB's website I was mad at myself for even considering this considerable (large amount of $) online purchase.  Vroom advertises during the Super Bowl and Carvana is even bigger but both had tons of Craig's List-like horror stories (sorry Craig's List, I have found tons of good deals there on all sorts of goods & services) about customers who shelled out out their hard-earned cash - traded-in their old car, but not being able to get their cars delivered during daylight hours, or titled or insured due to absent paperwork and no customer service to backup the "guarantees" in their commercials.  This is on top of the normal complaints you'd expect about the car not being as good as advertised in the pics.  It seems the same caveats apply to online purchases or new cars from these specialty sites that apply to buying riskier vintage cars.  Glad these Hagerty articles & comments are here to remind everyone of the risks of buying anything you can't see, (including the paperwork) touch, inspect and test drive!

Sajeev
Community Manager

Hi @JGMan you are right about the strikethrough text, as writers often use this trick to mention a similar issue that deserves an honorable mention as concisely as possible (as brevity is crucial in today's short-attention span Internet world.) It's also a way for journalists to be snarky, which I must admit is not beneath me. 

 

Your issues with Vroom are not uncommon, the big retailer they bought a few years back (Texas Direct Auto) is in my backyard and I've always warned everyone to inspect TDA's inventory in person. Not necessarily a bad thing, as TDA was happy to recondition items that I asked for specifically, but they'll happily sell you a beater with accident damage if you don't care to dig deeper. Vroom is the same way, but their prices (well before the pandemic) and their service is hard to ignore. 

 

Vroom/TDA are still a great place to find a bargain on quality used cars, but you gotta inspect them in person to know for sure! 

hyperv6
Racer

Never buy anything sight unseen. If you can not check it out have a club member of the brand or some accredited local appraiser take a look at it.

Never buy anything you can't get up on a rack. This one has saved me several times. A nice new red paint job will not fix the fist sized holes in the Frame of an El Camino.
Rick2
Instructor

I bought a 2002 Thunderbird off of craig's list from a hundred miles away so when I got there it didn't look to bad but I could not see under the car. Fist sized holes and other bad corrosion I believe it was used as a winter car in Chicago. So I sold it to a guy on craig's list and he tried to look under the car like I did but didn't see the mess. Now when I look if I can't get it on lift I use a phone to take pictures so no more surprises.
Forester
Intermediate Driver

I call a local repair shop to have them inspect it for me. They Charge an hours work. If seller won't take it there, then it's a scammer.
Land_Ark
Intermediate Driver

This story works both ways - as the seller and buyer. When I was selling a truck a few years ago I got the same story from someone who said they wanted to buy it for their uncle, or some such. He was going to send someone to come pick it up after paying for it for my asking price. Which, of course, would have turned out to be fraudulent and I would have been out a truck for no money.
I believe that the people are indeed not in the US and I suspect that if they get your car, it immediately goes into a shipping container never to be seen again.

I should have held onto that truck (2000 Dakota R/T)

Rider79
Technician

I had the same thing with a motorcycle I was selling in 2016. A guy in the military wanted to buy it for his father, full asking price, and wanted to pay via Paypal. Of course, I would have to give him my Paypal info. After thinking about that for a bit, I decided to not reply; I never heard from him again.
Bigcat75
Pit Crew

Had a similar situation on Auto Trader, was looking for a 3 series BMW, saw an M-6 for a low price, contacted them, high pressure, supposedly dealing with flight attendant overseas, car was listed as being in FL, had to sell quickly. Had a vin so I checked it on Car Fax, all service records were in CA. I questioned further, no good answers. Did more investigating, found similar scams, reported it to AT and they took it down. “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably isn’t”.
Tim
Technician

Wow, this type of scam has been around for YEARS. I can't believe that people are still trying it. Then again, people are still falling for it. After all that happened and the person still had to ask, "Am I being duped?"!

The quick question to ask is, "Would I do what the seller is doing if I was in his shoes?" This is where all the red flags should pop up. Why sell a car for such a low price if the market will easily pay more? Why ship a car at seller's cost without any guarantee of a sale? Why doesn't the seller have *anyone* local to help with a sale? For probably less the cost of a heavily discounted car and shipping costs, the seller could easily consign the car to a legitimate dealer.
nielen
Pit Crew

I bought 2 collector cars and sold 3 on what I consider a reliable auction site with quite a robust comment system, the possibility to view a car (I never did since the cars were on the other side of the continent) and it seemed to work out fine. I say ‘seem’ because you never fully know the engine condition. One was a six figure Porsche which runs great (drove it home 700 miles). The site has a strict policy of banning dishonest sellers as far as they can detect them. They also permanently ban no show bidders. The service record is posted as a standard feature. Buyers and sellers have to be registered. They follow up with phone calls, etc. I think as long as those types of checks and controls are in place the chances of being cheated are minimal. And if in doubt, have an agent view and inspect the car.
MustangJim
Technician

Your key word was reliable auction site.. another word is well known ( ok, two words). You have to be cynical in todays world.
Davidb
Intermediate Driver

P.T. Barnum once said "There is a sucker born every minute." He didn't know anything about cars, but he certainly knew people. Our society once hanged people for stealing a horse, why not when a car is stolen? One of my cars is 460 horses! Nuff sed.
DVSone
New Driver

Last year I was selling my Dodge SRT8. I was living in Buford, GA at the time. I got a text from someone named Gary who asked about the car, buying the car, sight unseen, was willing to pay the full price, and would pay with a cashiers check drawn on a Wells Fargo bank. I said, "sure, as long as he was willing to wait until the check cleared". Then he asked if he could put additional money on the check to pay for whomever would pick up the car and bring it to New Mexico. The check arrived Fed Ex and there was an additional $4,000 on the check. The car could have been shipped to Hawaii for that kind of money. I asked why so much and the answer was the freight company was picking up other stuff as well. Mind you, this conversation was via text. On top of that, the check was drawn on PNC band, not Wells Fargo. I took it two PNC banks to see if the check was good, neither could answer for sure, even after sending photos of the check to PNC corporate. The address I was given supposedly was a business, but by getting on Google Earth, it was a small ranch house. The business name was legit, but I called them and they never heard of "Gary". Gary kept asking if I deposited the check and could he come for the car. I told him the operative word was "cleared", not deposited, and that could easily take 10 days or more. The check was forged and suddenly I had no further contact from Gary.
One cannot be too careful today. It isn't just buyer beware, seller beware as well.
quaybon1
Pit Crew

A while ago, I was selling an 85 VW Vanagon Westfalia on Craigslist. I got an e-mail from a scammer who offered to buy it with a cashier's check for twice the amount from B of A. He said he would pick it up sight unseen and pay for shipping. I decided to play along and asked when I would get the check and when the camper would be picked up. He said that after I received the check he would make arrangements to get it. At the last minute I said I would only sell the car after the check cleared and I needed to be there when it was picked up. Never heard from him again.
quaybon1
Pit Crew

I have bought several cars Craigslist with good results, probably because I dealt with the seller at a neutral site.
JGMan
Intermediate Driver

I had a similar experience over 15 years ago. I asked the scammer to send me the over-priced, certified bank check to my office address at the federal prosecutor's office.  He didn't check out my address and sent it straight to the DOJ address.  I called the issuing bank and they told me that check number had been associated with over $500K worth of fraud at that point.  We tried to do some further investigation for a sting, but they weren't located in the U.S. and wouldn't give any domestic addresses, domestic accounts or a real person to contact or meet up with.

DrOverboost
Intermediate Driver

I had a similar problem with Racing Junk while selling car-related items. 13 very interested buyers in 3 days. All wanted to send some form of payment with “extra” shipping money in addition. None were legitimate offers. When I reported this to administration at Racing Junk they expressed no concern. Said it “happens all the time to them, ebay, Craigslist, etc.” They had no interest in “vetting” buyers but do so with sellers at many similar sites.
OldFordMan
Advanced Driver

Look at the photos carefully. 1 or 2 only tell you they might be "lifted" from somewhere else especially if they are somewhat grainy.
If there is no way to actually call (speech not text) and discuss the car it should be a red flag.
You should be able to see a copy of title in seller's name. If it has a lien and title held by, say a bank, that organization should be able to email or fax you a copy of it.
buellerdan
Instructor

I love the photos of cars for sale in Wisconsin with palm trees in the background.
JGMan
Intermediate Driver

Even funnier, we had one scammer on the phone and he said he was calling from a government office in Washington D.C. that gave out free government grants, but we could hear birds loudly chirping in the background.  I asked him what time it was over there in in his D.C. office? Long pause ...  Our number was blocked, so we strung him along for hours telling him we had sent him the application money via Western Union and he should keep checking his account.  Then told him we had sent it to an account number with some digits interposed.  I feel like we wasted a few hours of his time that he would have used to  scam other people - and we had a good laugh on our lunch break.

George1
New Driver

Best thing I ever learned from buying and selling on Bring a Trailer, ask for a picture of the title and a picture of ANY vin tag on the car. If they can't or won't do that, move on, it's that simple. There's nothing on the title that's so sensitive that it can't or won't eventually be shared when the potential buyer takes delivery of the car. Maybe the address of the seller if they're super paranoid but they can cover that up with a post it. Other than that, it will tell you when they bought it, received the title, sometimes the previous state titled in, obviously the vin, year, sometimes color; it's basically the birth certificate or at least the passport of the car. Cheers.

George
bblhed
Instructor

Remember that some states no longer provide Titles for cars over 20 years old so this may not always work. Then again they should have a registration for the car if it is currently registered.

bblhed
Instructor

When I was in the Navy I sold my 63 Chevy II (Nova) that was sitting comfortably in my fathers barn at the time. The buyer contacted me and I told him that I was stationed in GA and would be able to show the car and do the deal when I was home on leave. The deal went perfectly and the buyer had no problem waiting and paid in cash. The "I'm stationed overseas and can't be there" line should fall apart or stand up with the question "When will you be on leave?"
MustangJim
Technician

I still get faxes from the Nigerian Prince
Kern
Pit Crew

In the past two years I have purchased two collector cars at long distance. Both were found on legitimate websites. In both cases I had a local person inspect and ride/drive the cars before making a commitment to buy. Communications with the sellers was frequent and seemed honest and ethical.

The first was a low mileage example and has turned out to be a good investment, although that is not what was my purchase motive. I purchased it for $ 15K and an identical twin sold recently on Bring A Trailer for $ 22K.

The second was recently received. Prior to shipping it was inspected by a local specialist in that marque. He noted several mechanical issues but suggested that I would be hard pressed to find another with the desired specifications that had a body this solid. Some of the mechanical issues were sorted prior to shippins and a few remain. I may be upside down in this car for awhile but do not care as I bought it for the driving experience.

I have three more cars on the wish list and am willing to keep looking until the right car with the right specifications comes along. I am willing to pay a fair price for that right car.

As the article states, keep your antennae up and your money in your pocket until all the signs are positive with no red flags. Keep your emotion in check.
DonA427
Pit Crew

About 15 years ago I coordinated the sale of Mom's 2002 3 Series BMW. Based upon the recommendation of a reputable BMW salesperson, I advertised it on what appeared to be a safe BMW- enthusiast Web Site. In the ad I mentioned that the car is owned by a 70-plus year old woman and was treated gently. The first, immediate response I received was a person who said he (she?) would pay the price and will send me transport instructions. He said he will send me a bank check just before the BMW was to be transported. I smelled a fraud, so I wrote back and said we will need to meet in the parking lot of a local Police Station, and he is to bring cash. That ended the email interchanges; it was surely a fraud.
Pingechoreply
New Driver

The classic red flags on buying and selling are "In the (choose whatever military) posted in (choose country) and "friend picking up (if buying), sending additional cash for them". Always and everywhere a fraud. Only keep talking for laughs if you have nothing better to do. I bought my '67 Alfa Duetto via eBay, and the seller and I both had a fairly elaborate dance over the net; each of us wanted to make sure the other was in fact a real party, and then further that we weren't wasting each others time (nobody wants to travel hours to see a car to have it sold out from under them, nor rearrange a day to end up with a looky-loo). On a transaction of this size, I needed with his assurance that he would not sell the car out from under me in the next two days, if I provided him with flight information within 4 hours that I would be by within those two days to personably inspect the car. I assured him additionally that if the car was as described, that I would leave him a cash deposit, while we finalized the transaction. I took a two hour flight out (and home the next day, the car was beautiful, and once we both we clear that the other party was legitimate, and a great afternoon poking and prodding the car (which he had Brough to his mechanics shop, so that I could have it up on a lift before the test drive. For me, once into the 5 figures (let alone 6!), seeing the car, the seller, the title and talking to the mechanic who serviced it was very important. Drove the car home two weeks later over three days and and 800 miles. Never underestimate how many people will stop you driving on the PCH in a classic!

Selling the perfectly nice BMW convertible that funded the purchase resulted in a surprising number of servicemen stationed overseas who would send their friend with a cashiers check, no questions asked... I dint have the energy to play with them. Sold to a local in person. All went well that way.

As the subject of the article found, even a brach cant/won't tell you if the check is bogus. What the article didn'tmention is that if it is indeed fraudulent, with many banks your also on the hook for a hefty returned item fee as the depositor, as many banks enjoy picking up fees wherever and whenever.
Tennbull
Pit Crew

I listed my 230sL on Atlanta Craigslist a few years ago and within hours received an email from a prospective buyer within hours.They we’re in New York and offered to overnight a Cashiers check by Fedex.The next day I took the check to my bank and had the cashier call the 800 number and verify its authenticity.I then asked my banker how long it would take the check to bounce in case it was fraudulent and he answered “not more than two weeks”.That same day I received a call from the buyer inquiring when they could pick the car up.I told them two weeks and they seemed to understand and gave me their shippers number to call when I felt comfortable with the transaction.There still are some honest folks out there but due to all the scammers due diligence is required.
LoudV8
Intermediate Driver

Don't forget about the "time wasters" Was selling my 04 Z06. After several days communicating and sending pics, the guy flies in from out of state, inspects and drives the car, we make a deal and a plan to meet him at a local bank the following day. I then removed the ad, told other buyers the car was sold, took off work to meet the guy. Hours before the scheduled meet I get a call that he changed his mind. A real loser and time waster. My fault for telling other perspective buyers car was sold before actually selling it with cash in hand. Lesson learned.

drhino
Technician

I bought a rare motorcycle through a magazine ad in 2013. Had a local dealer do an inspection, lots of photos, check the title, etc. Checked the VIN with the manufacturer to ensure it wasn’t some clone nonsense. The best part was the dance the seller and I got involved in— both of us wary of the other. Neither of us had ever done a long distance transaction like that. Hell, he brought Counsel in to draw up an Agreement (fine with me, I have a JD as well). I was starting to wonder if it would ever get done; but happily— it did. And both sides were happy.
Studenorton
Instructor

I'm sure you more than most realize how hard it is to find a good lawyer, but I've found "access to counsel" comes in handy for all kinds of small business dealings. Probably because we have this great semi-retired guy who's really only still in it because it's interesting, the retainer does not amount to much and it's always earned back by one little contract document, deed detail or word of advice. Not even counting actual legal actions, for anybody who does a lot of buying and selling, knowing a good lawyer (or sending your kid through law school) is a smart investment. We'll be lost (legally) when ours retires.
Mike_M2
New Driver

I just learned something new about said scammers. When I see bad english grammar and spelling mistakes in a post, I think RED flag, but this is part of the scam. The bad grammar weeds out the smart people, they do not want you to reply to the ad. Think about it, if you see the scam you don't even bother to respond to it, and you are correct they do not want you to. They want the uneducated people.
pyasher
Pit Crew

I would never buy anything without seeing it myself or paying for a professional appraisal. I was interested in a Cadillac CTS V wagon that was 3 hours away. After a discussion with the seller I got in my truck and drove to the location. It is now in my shop / garage awaiting cut outs and carbon fiber goodies...
LoudV8
Intermediate Driver

Same here. Was looking all over the country and willing to travel for a CTS V coupe with manual trans. A low mileage decent price one popped up at a dealer 1 hr away. Now in my garage.

JBBearcat
Advanced Driver

Here in the Northwest there is a regional online "auto mall" of classifieds from 2-3 states and a couple of Canadian provinces.
Very legit.
They have a page warning of scams.
One was a warning about a broker and repair shop in Portland. There was a link to an anti-spam site with more details...I was curious so I looked.
They would go on Facebook or somewhere with a nice car (Ferraris and SUVs) at a good price.
Usually the scam was..."I'm selling a car that was owned by my late dad, but I'm overseas on an oil platform. So I have listed it with this broker".
Nice building, filled with high end cars...all with the distinctive UK plates. Some of the cars in the background were models not sold in the U.S.
The "happy customers" links where buyers extolled the virtues of the dealer were all professional head shots of models, all very happy and smiling. Come on, no regular people have selfies like that.
The dealership/brokerage photos were just an added veneer to the scam.
Come on people...LOOK at the photos.
Jkatzen6o
Pit Crew

A little more than two years ago I purchased a site unseen 1966 Thunderbird from about 200 miles away from my home in Fabulous Las Vegas in Wickenburg, Arizona. I found it online and called a phone # after a short email exchange with the owner. All seemed legit, so I had a friend drive me to buy the car. It was beautiful and about 99.9% original so I bought it and had an elating drive home and exciting speeding curvy drive through the mountains near Black Canyon and Hoover Dam, home. When I went a few days later to register it and transfer the title I found that the bank attested notarized title was not quite enough for Nevada DMV. Of course when I called Hagerty while still in the driveway of the seller in Arizona the agent quickly processed some numbers and assured me that I was covered for the addition of the new to me auto on my existing policy. I found out at the NVDMV that I needed a release from the man's estate, EVEN THOUGH He LIVED AND BREATHED. All was healed by a phone call and subsequent emailing of forms and a letter with an original signed release from the estate. It only goes to show however, that after purchasing perhaps a hundred vehicles lifetime that there is always one more question unanswered that a D M V will ask.
JGMan
Intermediate Driver

I had a worse time with the NJ DMV, who told me the classic Jeep I had purchased from Connecticut ( a stones throw away from NJ) needed a title to transfer ownership, versus the CT registration and bill of sale I had.  I told her CT doesn't use titles for cars over 20/25 years old.  She said that was silly I needed a title and it was too late for her to call the main office in Trenton (that closed an hour earlier than them for some reason) to get a supervisory legal opinion so I'd have to come back tomorrow (I had already waited several hours in line and taken time off from work).  I was 100% correct and eventually got it titled another day, with a different DMV clerk.  And everyone knows you folks in NV and AZ are nicer and more polite than North Jersey folk.

RG440
Instructor

Enjoyed the article ! After reading, for me, ensuring you won’t get scammed was summed up in #8, the last paragraph. Every purchase I have made online I have dealt with the owner/seller directly with questions BEFORE the purchase. Anything not answered was a red flag and shied me away from hitting the button. I always let them know before purchase, if I did purchase, on that day of purchase, BEFORE any transfer of money, I would required a photo of title next to vehicle serial # AND a photo of SELLER with vehicle along with the purchase date written on a piece of cardboard (or anything) being held by the seller. It has always worked for me. An added bonus is when doing a photo search of (auto, bike, boat, trailer) you always have a file of seller, vin and purchase date.
cestor01
Intermediate Driver

I had an online experience last year that was not entirely negative. I was looking for a manual Chevelle, but really just wanted the body because I had a transmission and engine. I found one online after a lot of searching. It said it was complete car but needed some restoration. I had another chevelle to use the engine it had. It was a good price. I researched the company, which was a consigner. I paid, had the car shipped. The car wasn't restorable, but the body was good, which is what I wanted anyway, but wouldn't have paid so much had I known the engine, transmission, and rear were scrap metal. However, I hadn't found anything else, so I was only a little disappointed. The trick was, no title. It was a Mexico car, never legally registered in the US. However, the consigner did help me get a title, so everything is good, I guess.
dhaugh
Detailer

I can go on with this for hours, though instead I'll share a few quick stories.

Several years ago I found a great K Code Mustang convertible, it was supposedly located in the Netherlands. I contacted the seller and they instructed me to make the payment to someplace I didn't recognize. I told the seller that I have employees all over the world and I could send one of them within 24 hours with cash in hand and they would take the vehicle. Lots of crap about "we have to arrange shipping, do import documents and the like". I knew at the beginning it was a scam though I like playing them just for sport, I of coarse never heard from them again.

Same thing happened with a beautiful Turbo Esprit V8, the car looked amazing and was priced market correct, I got the same thing as your reader, you pay the transport company and they keep it in escrow. I played with him for about two weeks, offered to have someone come to Hartford, CT where the car was stored and give cash in hand. The purported seller tried to keep me going for a couple of weeks and then realized I wasn't going to bite.

Starting in January I've decided I need (need is a very strong word) an Aston Martin DB7, I found one in Chicago that was being sold by a dealer in CT. Since I'm in Milwaukee I drove down to the dealer that had it, not the selling dealer. I drove the car, they were asking 30K for what was likely a 3K car, timing chain rattles, super charger needed rebuilding and the leather, although good looking was not good. I took a pass. The next one was a car being sold in Florida and was supposedly in Texas. I called and spoke to the salesperson and it stunk of a scam, because this was more than a whim and I had a real interest in purchasing one, I didn't bother playing the seller.

That brings me to my trip on this coming Monday morning to Sacramento to do an inspection of what looks to be a really nice car, it's a convertible though it ticks all the other boxes, low mileage, 6 speed and a V12, I would have rather had a coupe though this one looks like a really nice example. When I spoke to the seller it turns out he's an automotive author and we chatted for a good 45 minutes, and I could tell it wasn't a scam. I asked if I could send a deposit to hold it for two weeks until I could make my way there, he agreed. When I offed the 1000 dollar deposit (never offer more of a deposit than you're willing to lose) I asked him to e mail me when he received it, he did and then noted he wouldn't cash my check until I purchased it (more good feelings). He had initially agreed to have one of my local guys come and do an initial cursory glace and he said that would be fine, after talking to him and exchanging e mails I knew there was no need for that, and I still had to inspect myself. The seller has been great to work with, I found the car on Craigslist and must have been his first person reaching out from his post. When we spoke earlier this week he noted that he's received tons of inquiries though because he had my deposit he would wait for me to travel there. When I asked who services the car he said he did, after googling him and finding lots of online information, one noting him pulling the engine and transaxle out of his Pantera I figured the guy knew what he was doing. When I get back next Wednesday I'll let you know how it turned out.

And, wouldn't you know it there's a 15K mile coupe on BAT with a 6 speed that's currently at about 10K less than what I'll pay for the Sacramento one. Looking at the BAT post it looks like a nice car, but who knows? I'm watching the auction which ends in 2 hours but I like my seller much more, I thing the seller on BAT is a flipper judging from the background of the photos and I'm not willing to gamble, we'll see what the final sell price is. I much prefer to touch, feel drive and inspect before purchasing rather than taking a gamble on line.
AutoVelocity
New Driver

I was running a Honda dealership on the West Coast and was refered a customer whose Son was moving from New York into the area and needed a car. The mother called me and specified the type of car she wanted. I sent her information about a car that fit the specifications.
The next day she responded that she had found the same car online in Minnesota for $10,000 less. She sent me the ad link to prove it. It was in fact the same car and I mean the exact same car that I had on my lot including the VIN number!
She would not understand why I wouldn't lower the price of my car $10,000 to match the ad price. I spent two days explaining to her that it was a fake ad and that they were using pictures and information from my car on my lot to scam her.
After all that she asked me: So, should I send him the deposit since this is such a better deal than your car?
1. You can't fix stupid
2. Greed will make you blind