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6 European cars with American pushrod V-8 power

About two years ago, the Hagerty Drivers Club editorial team picked three sporty, European-designed cars powered by American V-8s and headed to the foothills for a day of canyon driving. The trio included an AC 428, which is a handsome, powerful convertible fitted with, appropriately, a 428-cubic-inch Ford V-8. The trio also included a Jensen Interceptor and an Iso Grifo, two of my all-time-favorite European/American hybrids.

 

I’m an unapologetic fan of pushrod V-8s, big-block and small-block alike, and the idea of beautiful bodywork wrapped around an easy-to-tune, easy-to-upgrade pushrod V-8 is a match made in heaven.

 

Read the full article on Hagerty.com:

https://www.hagerty.com/media/lists/6-european-cars-with-american-pushrod-v-8-power/

Replies (60)

Replies (60)

How about the TVR Tuscan?

New Driver

IMHO I believe one that you left out and is a beautiful design= Pantera.  Exotic and easy to work on.  Aftermarket up-grades (needed) are well manufactured and the Pantera commuity is full of wonderful people always ready to jump in and help

New Driver

The De Tomaso Pantera powered by Ford's 351 C was one of the few European cars with American V8s to make it to North America.

New Driver

Jensen Interceptor = Chrysler powered

New Driver
Pit Crew

Intermeccanica Omega and all things Griffith (TVR etc) and DeTomaso are conspicuous by their absence.  Come on guys!

Passenger

I'm disapointed you didn't have the Iso Griffo on your list. Back in the 60s I used to go to a local Chrysler dealer that sold them. And even though a net search reveals that they were powered by big block Chevy and Ford Clevelands, I'm sure the ones I saw had Mopar engines. They were exquisitly stylish thanks to those damned Italians. And fast.

Pit Crew

Sunbeam Tiger, with the small block Ford V8.  Lots of fun to drive such a light car with so much torque!

Passenger

I've always been a fan of the DeTomaso Pantera; ever since I first saw one in a magazine as a kid.

Passenger

Awesome article about one of my favorite niches of the car hobby - the true, original "Hybrids!"

Pit Crew

I'm struck by how much the Ghia 450 nose resembles the first Celica.

Passenger

Pantera?

Graham-Paige_0-1587741499001.jpeg

 

New Driver

I still own my TR8 I bought new. I few modes over the year and it dynos at 250hp. Still is a great fun to drive. I park next to Ferraris and seem to as much if not more attention and questions. Bob

Passenger

 

 

 

New Driver

Someone has already mentioned Bristol, but I was thinking of the Bristol 410 and 411 with Mopar 318 and 383 in them respectively.

Navigator

The Ghia 450 looks like a scaled down Ford Torino in the front!
I am very sure that Tjaarda's Forenza design did NOT influence the Jeep ZJ,as that was going on years before at AMC.

Intermediate Driver

Intermechanica Italia and Indra and all of Iso Rivolta cars were equipped with american v8s. 

Passenger

Great article!  I love the lines of the Bizzarini 5300 GT.  Smoking hot!

Passenger

Notice how many have no exterior rear view mirrors, or in some cases, only a left but no right.

New Driver

Jensen CV8, Jensen FF (4 wheel drive), De Tomaso Mangusta, Pantera and Deauville, Ginetta G10, all Bristols since 407, Gordon Keeble, some TVR... And off course soooo many Rovers and derivatives (Range Rovers, Land Rovers, Morgans, several TVR's et al) since Solihull adapted and adopted the wonderful Buick 215 lightweight V8. The list is longer than one would think. Long live pushrod V8! 

New Driver

Additionally the DeTomaso Mangusta's with its incredible organic lines and ford (289 or 302) powerplant is right there with the Iso Grifo. 

Passenger

I  am  enjoying  your  news  letters  immensely,  They  are  Awesome.  Many  thanks.  

Passenger

Where is the Griffith?

Passenger

Triumph TR8 had a Buick V8

New Driver

Gordon-Keeble, small-block Chevy

Passenger

Jensen Interceptor had a Chrysler lump.

Passenger

DeTomaso Pantera

New Driver

What about the Sunbeam Tiger.  The series 1 and 1A had a Ford 260 cu.in. and the Series 2 had the infamous Ford 289.  These engines were not hot rodded but absolutely stock hp.  For a British sports car of the period, they were totally civil to drive (handled well). comfortable, roll-up windows. windshield wipers and heater/defroster that worked, the convertible top actually went up and down with minimal effort and stored undetectable. I owned 2 over the years and kick myself every for selling the second one.

 

Passenger

the article on the Simca is partly wrong ford never owned part of simca , Simca was originally set up by an Italian immigrant in France as an importer of fiat cars eventually manufacturing fiat models in France , when Ford decided to stop making cars in France Simca bought the operations (they also bought Talbot Lago , Unic trucks and more) and it's new project the Ford vedette and the flathead v8 rebading it as the Simca Vedette this car was also built in Brazil as the Simca Chambord , the Simca Esplanada was designed in Brazil with underpinnings based on the Chambord in 66 Chrysler bought Simca and restyled the car , Chrysler ended up ruining (as they did everything else , Chrysler as since been through more hands than a hooker at some Nevada brothel) Simca the second best selling mark in France  , when Peugeot took over in late 70's changed the name to Talbot but  the models were ugly as hell marking the end

  

Passenger

The 383 Mopar is NOT a big Block.

Passenger