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Hagerty
Hagerty Employee

3 handy electronic tools to keep in your modern classic | Hagerty Media

Not everyone wants or needs to carry a tool kit in each vehicle they drive. Your late-model daily-driver that's proved totally reliable shouldn't need more than a spare tire and a jack, if that. Each tool kit should be balanced for the vehicle and its intended purpose.
https://www.hagerty.com/media/lists/3-handy-electronic-tools-to-keep-in-your-modern-classic/
88 REPLIES 88
OldRoad
Instructor

If your powered by a 4.0 Jeep take a spare fuel pressure regulator with your next excursion into the weeds. They blow frequently but are easy to change, 10 min max.
RobErnst
New Driver

Since I drive a Corvair, a spare fan belt, points and a 9/16th wrench are in my required roadside assistance kit... I also carry some primary wire, and an AutoZone toolkit. No need for a code reader...
jaguare22
New Driver

Ok, what is the carabiner type thing keeping your wrenches together? Is that homemade or bought? Good idea!
tseife
New Driver

I recently discovered something almost identical. Harbor Freight has them. Go to their website and search for "wrench rings". They come in packages of (2) for $1.99. I agree with you, the idea is a winner and it's cheap.
win59
Detailer

That is a neat clip, but I run a few turns of mechanic's wire (bailing wire) through the ends of the wrenches and then a few more turns around them to keep them from rattling. The wire has been used more than the wrenches!
a few tywraps will come in handy too.
clyde
New Driver

Anyone knows the availability of exact kind of wrench holder pictured?
What I like: the nice mechanism and the straight bar from which all wrenches hang. The Harbor Freight version is primitive in comparison.
dblinton
New Driver

I have a couple of those around here. The ones I have are for putting in draw bolts so they don't pop out when you are towing something with a tractor. They don't work real well for that...catch in cornstalks etc. but I may start using them for keeping wrenches together.
clyde
New Driver

Anyone knows the availability of the exact kind of wrench holder pictured?
What I like: the nice mechanism and the straight bar from which all wrenches hang. The Harbor Freight version is primitive in comparison.
Brandan
Hagerty Employee

That is homemade. My brother gave me that idea 20 years ago or so. I think it's just plain old stainless rod.
HistoricAfton
Intermediate Driver

You can make your own with some aluminum tubing or old brake line. Pretty handy my buddy at the airport did it, keeps them in order. Does not work with open end wrenches.
hearsedriver
Intermediate Driver

sorry but the word "classic" does not come to mind when viewing the range of modern some tone of grey shapeless lumps that have passed for automobiles since the 90's.
i agree with your 3 choices, however, you need to have a PAPER copy of what the ODBII codes mean with you as well. a cell can be used to call for a tow or a buddy, but if you really go off road in the boonies cell coverage for your overpriced smart phone (and the therefore the internet) may not exist. i suggest sturdy footwear for the walk out to civilization......
TimK
Detailer

For the most part I agree. I also don't think most Japanese imports of any year nor a 1965 Chrysler Newport 4 door sedan are classics either but beauty is in the eye of the beholder. If not classics I call them special interest so not kick the sleeping dog too hard. But I have a 94 Mark VIII and consider it a classic. Apparently Hagerty does too since they insure it.
OldRoad
Instructor

It was my impression that Hagerty insures cars 40 yrs and older. I believe I read that in their policy information.
Drake
Pit Crew

No, I have a 1995 BMW convertible and I'm insured over Hagerty. A so called modern classic, and is an import. The same rules apply, can't be an everyday vehicle, etc...

F360Spider
Detailer

I keep an OBDII reader in the glove box of my Ferrari 360. I can attach it to the port blindfolded now. The 360 has a tempermental electrical system that can throw codes for no reason, or to indicate a major problem. Many don't even cause a CEL. I typically check for codes each time I get gas just to be sure nothing is going Tango Uniform. While the 360 comes with a tool kit from the factory, no one in their right mind would use those tools to actually work on the car. They are poor quality and have some sort of mystical air that requires them to be sold with the vehicle unused. Ferrari's are an odd lot.

 

Gated Ferrari 360 Spider in Azzurro California / CremaGated Ferrari 360 Spider in Azzurro California / Crema

Swamibob
Instructor

I love the fact your Ferrari is not red! Good show. I dig the blue.
SGL
Pit Crew

Instead of a standalone code scanner, I’d recommend one of the small modules that plugs into the OBD port and connects to your phone or tablet via Bluetooth. The smarts live on the phone and are easily updated, support a TON of vehicles (and more are added with each update), and also provided a menu-driven explanation of what each code means, and the most common causes/fixes. You can also put up live read outs of various sensors... I mean who doesn’t want to watch the left and right catalyst temps in real time? The good ones also support control modules in addition to the engine controller (transmission, power module, ABS/traction control).
Brandan
Hagerty Employee

I have one of those but the app is no longer supported by my current phone.
monkeyboy
New Driver

I don't see a tire pressure gauge in that first tool pic. Too obvious? Tiny air compressor, a can or two of fix-a-flat. I may get a jumper box - I have a failing battery (and maybe phantom current leak: it's got a 30w photocell charger); it's tedious to move second car and use jumper cables.
RonD
Intermediate Driver

Tow strap at a minimum, mounted winch if you're going deep into the tundra!
manorborn
Pit Crew

Maybe in the taiga, but in the tundra there are no trees for the winch. 😉
Jake
Intermediate Driver

Most of what is pictured in the article is of no use for my 1930's era hot rods. Metric wrenches - nope, nothing like that here. The only scanner needed is a timing light and dwell meter. Torx drivers - none of those either! Some common wrenches (1/2", 9/16" & 5/8" covers most things); a couple of screwdrivers (phillips & flat); vice grips; some electrical wire and electrical tape; points file; a crescent wrench and some bailing wire. A multimeter would be nice if you are splurging. Don't forget the spare parts - distributor cap, rotor, points and condenser (always the points and condenser), and a spare set of spark plugs. If you are planning a cross-country trip (I have done several in my '34 Plymouth hot rod), perhaps add a spare alternator (or brushes for a generator if you are using one). The only concession to modern technology is the last resort tool - the cell phone, charged of course!
Happy Motoring!
Jake
Intermediate Driver

I forgot to add the coil to the list of suggested spare parts.
monkeyboy
New Driver

Huh. I don't see spare fuses or bulbs either.
Brandan
Hagerty Employee

There's a lot more in the bag and the tote.
DAdams
Intermediate Driver

A couple thoughts. If your late model classic has OBDI (pre 1989) you will need a diagnostic scanner(s) dedicated to each make/model. Or you can read the codes by switching the ignition on-off-on-off-on (it takes a little practice and finesse to get it right) and counting the flashes on the Check Engine light. You will need a cheat-sheet to interpret the codes. If your late model classic has OBDII (1989 up) - and is a MOPAR (at least thru 2003) - you do not need a diagnostic scanner. Chrysler maintained (at least they did on the Dakota) the old OBDI trick of turning the ignition on and off three times to put the onboard diagnostic system into scan mode. The codes will be displayed on the odometer. As with OBDI, you will still need a cheat-sheet (available w/web access) as only raw codes are displayed, but at least the display is alphanumeric and easy to read. In my (very) limited experience, this trick for OBDII ONLY works on MOPARs.
Geok86
Advanced Driver

OBD1 was used through 1995, as the mandate for OBD2 was for 1996 onward. Some vehicles may have switched a bit earlier, but definitely not in 1990. My 1995 Firehawk is OBD1, but was already fitted with OBD2 port, so it requires an adapter, or year specific tool.
Geok86
Advanced Driver

A little research shows that a VERY small amount of 94-95 model year vehicles were built with OBD2, so all 93 and earlier, and the vast majority of 94-95 were OBD1.
OldRoad
Instructor

Toyota went OBD2 in 91. Ford in 95.
MoparMarq
Detailer

Odometer display technigue works on Jeeps also - at least it does on my sister's '04 Grand Cherokee.
chrlsful
Instructor

yeah, not much I wanna do road side. V e r y basic tools (my multitool on my belt) a vice grip, the 2 - 4 screw drivers, spare tune up prts, bulbs, w.w fluid, anti-frez'n cranckcase oil. The last 3 or 4 as I don't wanna pay gas station prices if down/low (need the discount store chems). So much better to drag/tow, tiltbed-it to the comfort of the garage...
WoodBoatChick
Pit Crew

How about "Slime" or some other tire sealant? For my 69 E, I keep an aired-up spare, but for many newer cars, there are no spares. My C7 Corvette has all season "Run Flats", and my 2017 Jaguar F-type has a repair kit that originally came with a tire sealant and a small compressor. The "use by" date on that sealant had passed, so I packed a fresh container of Slime.
Padgett
Intermediate Driver

Your tire shop will blacklist you but if have no choice then. I prefer to carry a compact spare.
Fiero had a compact spare but no-place to carry the road wheel, something to consider.
Chevelle_man
Intermediate Driver

Flashlight, batteries for all electronics (and flashlight), spare belts and hoses, antifreeze, oil, a gas can is always useful, a bottle jack can be VERY useful. Maybe it's just the Boy Scout in me! I also like to have a friend or two along who knows HOW to diagnose and fix problems. A few years ago on a Route 66 road trip with friends, I lost an upper control arm bolt (and bushing) and was 3 threads from losing the other. We were 50 miles west of Albuquerque, NM. We stopped, disassembled the front end, drove to NAPA in town, got replacement bolts and the missing bushing, drove back to the roadside, and put it all back together. We lost a few hours, but were able to resume our trip.
larrydh8
Pit Crew

Good ideas, all.  Also some water to add to the antifreeze-make it potable so you have some for yourself.  Have a forehead strap-on flashlight too.  

OldRoad
Instructor

You lost a control arm bushing? How is that possible as bushings are pressed into the control arm hinge???
Swamibob
Instructor

Not that difficult. On some upper control arms, the upper bushing is pressed in, but there is also a bolt on retainer that holds it in place. If you don't loctite the threads of the bolt, they can work loose, the bolt comes out and the bushing will work it's way out. Then it makes a weird clunking noise when you're coming back from the store. If you're lucky, like I was, you will find the bushing stuck on the frame and be able to put it all back together in your own shop. With loctite on the threads the second dime. 🙂
brb
Advanced Driver

I second the spare belt(s), tire pressure gauge, and mini air compressor suggestions. I also carry a tire repair kit in all my vehicles, including motorcycles. That and the compressor has saved my bacon on many back country adventures.

Best advice: Get a friend with the same vehicle to go along so you can steal parts as required.
uweschmidt
Detailer

First of all we are tampering with Mutphys Law here Murphy/s Law states Clearly no matter how much Stuff you take with you theone thing you will need you won't have secondly things like electric Fuelpumps quit unexpectedly Real classic usually can be fixed With Gum haywire gasproof tape of any kind Binderstring Waterpump Pliers and most importantly: a Railroad Spike and a Rock and if you had the foresight to bring a Girl along you can draft her Panty Hose for many uses



Padgett
Intermediate Driver

If have Lucas electrics, always carry a hammer (large spanner will do in a pinch).
uweschmidt
Detailer

Also adviseable not to go out at Nights or in the Rain I defiled my classic Alfa (marelli electrics mostly Lucas related) by insrtlling a mazda Alternator Ford regulater ford headlite switch Mazda Wipersystem and a toyota heater cut in half ::::2o years trouble free !!!!!
DT
Detailer

Lucas. Prince of Darkness 🙂
Swamibob
Instructor

I agree always carry the often used Ford Wrench, in many sizes. 🙂
DT
Detailer

I don't think many women wear panty hose anymore. Most just go commando 🙂
larrydh8
Pit Crew

Pantyhose...Reminds of the guy who said he was a "Diesel Fitter"...Worked in the pantyhose factory as a quality control guy;  would inspect each pair, saying , yup, "dese 'll fit her."...

Numberscruncher
Detailer

Modern “classic” is an oxymoron.
jjd1010
Pit Crew

What, no dock tape?
jjd1010
Pit Crew

OOPS, duck tape.
jjd1010
Pit Crew

Or should that be duct tape. !>)