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Bryan
Hagerty Employee

2020 Hagerty Hot List: The 6 collector rides of the future

Which of today’s cars will be collectible in the future? Imagine buying the car of your choice brand-new, driving it for 100,000 miles or more, then selling it for twice what you paid. Does that sound like fiction? It’s not—if the car in question is an Acura Integra Type R, or a fourth-generation Toyota Supra Turbo, or a Porsche 911 “RS America.” Could that kind of lightning strike your next new-car purchase? There’s no way to know for sure, of course, and if your Camry TRD is the toast of Barrett-Jackson in 2060 we will have to admit that our crystal ball had a few cracks in it, but according to our team of valuation and collector experts, the five cars and one motorcycle listed below stand a strong chance of remaining desirable and worthy of respect by generations of enthusiasts to come.

 

Read the full article on Hagerty.com:

https://www.hagerty.com/media/lists/2020-hagerty-hot-list-the-6-collector-rides-of-the-future/

46 REPLIES 46
Pepperalls
Detailer

Interesting list I suppose, but pretty safe (unless the bike is an oddball, I don't follow bikes really). Of course people are going to low-mile pickle most of these limited run Shelbys and sell them as collectible commodities forever after. Not sure there is a story to that really.

 

Timewarp back to 1957 and what would you have predicted? Probably a Vette, 300, Thunderbird, top of the line Cadillacs, etc.  57 Chev weren't the best seller (Ford was) and yet 57 Bel Air became a super-aspirational vehicle that arose from the masses rather than being elite to start with (Black Widows excepting I suppose but most people didn't know about those).

 

My point being... nothing common for the masses made this list. I'll give you one: Hyundai Veloster type N.

 

50 years from now, type N could very well be the early Z car, Iroc, etc. of this 2020 era. Not a limited production elite thing  --but special, memorable and collectable but not hoarded as such when new by rich people.

mchalewj
Pit Crew

In 1958, I wonder if the Edsel would be declared collectible because of its unique features and styling.

Rider79
Instructor

Maybe, except for its bizarro styling.

GoFast
Detailer

smart choices except for the Jeep.  They will be too common to appreciate.  The Corvette plant will be lucky to built 10,000 2020 cars, not 20k.  And only chunk of the roof is removable, not the whole top.

avideo
Intermediate Driver

And smart future Corvette owners will likely wait until November to order a 2021 C8 Corvette and wait for delivery next year. I know that's what we will be doing - since we want a Convertible model - not a coupe; which is what is mostly being produced and sold right now. 

CJinSD
Advanced Driver

Anything naturally aspirated with a stick will be money in the bank in a decade, assuming that money and banks still exist.

rootine4
Pit Crew

I hope you are right. I own a 427 Collector's Edition that is 1 of 84 imported to Canada, one of 208 in Night Race Blue Metallic and 1 of 2552 cars in all. The hand-built 7.0 l. puts out 505 naturally aspirated HP and it was only available in a manual. I am worried no one will know how to drive a stick.

F360Spider
Detailer

Sounds optimistic but I'm hoping you're right. I have a gated Ferrari 360.

 

F360_Rear_Quarter.jpg

SuperCommando
Pit Crew

Maybe.  Cars of today are fatally dependent on the technology of *today*, that once technology inevitably advances in a couple years, today's cars will be obsolete.  Maybe they could become part of a museum diorama once they are no longer operable.  I have a new Charger, and it freaks me out that everything is controlled by the center stack touchscreen...once that this goes out, and if there isn't a replacement available, then that's it.  I don't have this problem with my 30, 40, 50, and even 60 year old cars

CJSMustangs
New Driver

Great points on the technology aspect.  As innovations develops, today’s technology will be obsolete in 5 years and when it needs repair, it may or may not be available.  How many of us have VCRs or DVD players?  Those were prevalent less than 5-7 years ago and now they are gone.   

F360Spider
Detailer

The only one on that list that I see with legs is the Rubicon. Those things are always hot with the enthusiasts. I owned a 2006 Rubicon for about a year before I had to sell it when the little one came along. It took all of a week to get numerous full price (same as I paid a year before) offers and the purchaser wanted to buy it sight unseen. I told him I'd only sell it in person so he left that day to drive 500 miles to get it.

 

The ad generated calls for the next FIVE YEARS! It was an army green two door model. Very desirable from what I've been told. To me, the Jeep was difficult to drive, complained above 50 MPH and got horrible gas mileage. We towed it behind our motorhome and it had so much rolling resistance that it reduced the MPG of our motorhome by 20%. I got more attention driving the Rubicon than I get driving my Ferrari 360. I doubt the demand for these trucks will ever dissipate. 

RichZ
New Driver

What about the 2014 Corvette C7 1 of 500 Deluxe east and west coast limited editions?

Mikrobert
Passenger

See to be considered for the list, it’s in the paragraphs before the list starts. 

77GL
Intermediate Driver

Pretty sure the mid-engine Corvette is the only correct choice to be a future collectible.

drhino
Instructor

“The RC213V-S was about as close as the public will ever get to a street-legal MotoGP race bike.“


Nope. You have actually described the Street version of the Ducati Desmosedici. Also, the Panigale has had “wings” for a few years. 

Alico87
Intermediate Driver

I think the best bet is the CT6-V, it has a lot going for it, and truly limited production. The Shelby is much the same although I expect more will be well preserved. I think the Gladiator Rubicon is the least likely to appreciate, or at least not quickly. Jeeps hold their value, but Gladiator Rubicons are reasonably common and unless it's a model that gets cancelled quickly I don't see appreciation for at least 30 years as there simply isn't the same motivation. 

motofun
New Driver

The Honda RRRR is only blahh with my track riding buddies.  Too much $ and only so so in the track mode.  I will agree that Honda has way with building not-well-recieved bikes that go on to be very collectable.  The CBX, The Brit 500cc clone are examples of this.  Me?  I'll stick with affordable, raceable bikes like my Suzuki 750 and 1000R that out perform the Honda and can survive being crashed without me having to commit hari kiri.

ratcva
New Driver

I take exception with the Cadillac. No current teenager is clamoring to own one. A 93 Allante is one of those knockout punches and they’re no where close in value, in constant dollars or otherwise. The Volvo, it’s beautiful, but same problem. The GT500 is a sure thing. And I would think the Vette, but I certainly never imagined a ZR-1 would be so cheap and they’re starting their early thirties in age. 

gusperez
Passenger

I the Bently GT Convertible on any similar list? 

cal333
Pit Crew

Stashing brand new hot rides for future financial appreciation is a crap shoot...it depends if replacement computers, screen gizmos and battery packs will still available...aging hybrids and battery propulsion might find failed components as difficult to obtain and extremely expensive...even the "all gasoline" hot tickets today depend heavily on computers and video screens...the repair technicians of today might not have the testing equipment or redundant training to repair your aging brand new collectible...it seems best to stuff away something that you can tune and repair yourself...and also stuff away the parts needed like spark plugs, distributor parts, brake pads, fan belts and windshield wipers to keep your collectible drivable...even new tires in proper sizes might be tough to find...as to the new C8 Corvette...too many will be built and it does not have "timeless styling" like the C2 Corvettes do...most C2s have today's market values up to 20 times their original MSRP...I really doubt that a stuffed C8 can match that appreciation...if you yearn for the current assortment of hot rides...buy it, drive it like you stole it...and dump it before the warranty runs out...

pappy67
Passenger

No wander hot rodding is dyeing .  All of these cars are too expensive and the average person can't work on it them self . Half the  fun was building  it your way and taking it out and showing it off . Sad to say but most of these cars , seen one seen them all .

chrlsful
Instructor

I'm w/pap.

Not sure the typical Hagerty hag (me?) but these vehicles are for those who "buy'n hold". I & those I know are more the sort who 'buy low, restore, daily a few months, sell for income".  We don't need a "today's hot cars". We need "what's the next sought classic".

The 60/70s muscle is coming to the end. B4 that I wrked on 50/60s Italian.  Now I see the fox coming in (it goes w/the buyer age)...I don't think I'll B around for the nxt, at least not buyin, haulin, and wrenchin...(  guess they'll all B Japanese? 300GT, 300ZX, Supra Turbo, RX7, CRX Si?)...

rm8ty
Passenger

The Honda caption says "2 passenger" But I only see a solo seat and no rear pegs. A tad uncomfortable for the "passenger"?

Eric
Hagerty Employee

fixed, thanks

BobA
Pit Crew

Re the bike: "2 passenger". Really? I'm looking. Where does the second one sit and put their feet? I'm going to leave aside for now the argument that there are zero passengers since the only rider is the "driver".

Scott
Pit Crew

Man, where have I been that a base price on a motorcycle is $29K.

okfoz
Intermediate Driver

One thing I have learned about modern cars... next year they will always have a better, faster one.  The GT500 is a perfect example, the Previous Generation GT500 has held its value pretty well, but it still went down, I suspect this generation will do the same.   Only God knows the future and whether one of these are even remotely close to being a "investment worthy" purchase.    With the exception of a Ferrari or a Lamborghini few cars actually hold their value, especially cars which were made in mass.    What drives car prices put simply what does the public want?  How many were made? and what is someone willing to pay?
The Public is fickle, in 10 years internal combustion engines might be less than the number of Gas powered cars, that will effect the prices greatly.   Speed is often a driving factor in purchases like this, ultimately an EV will be able to outperform most internal combustion engine equivalents... 
There are always exceptions,  there were something like 1.7 Million 57 Chevys made, between the 150/210/Bel Air. and those are quite desirable, but again it is a work of art.  
Ultimately if someone could create a car that they knew would be the next 57 Chevy, or the next 67 Corvette, I believe they would.  Unfortunately those cars do not come along that often, they are either under powered, or they go out of style.  IT is hard to speculate how the Big-Mouth-Bass GT500 or the Edgy Corvette might age in 20 or 30 years. 

Maestro1
Instructor

I have the same issues SuperCommando has. I think technology has enslaved us, when it should have been the other way around. I won't go near any of them, with the exception of the Polestar, which is stunning and I would not drive it on the street with all the irresponsible and/or illiterates out there. The reason is technology. I can fix most of my collection if something goes wrong while on the road. Why? Because the issue is mechanical not electronic, and the systems do not rely on some stupid computer. The designs of these cars with the exception of the Polestar are atrocious. Auto designers need to go back to school or get counselling or both. The designs do speak to the rudeness and ferment currently in this Country. 

46HudsonPU
Pit Crew

Honestly, the one on this list that I am personally very disappointed about is the Jeep Gladiator Rubicon.  Not even an option for a pickup-type cab (two doors, vs. four doors), and no full length bed.  Actually, much more than just disappointed- I feel cheated...

Waterboy1KHY80
Intermediate Driver

Here's one, I sold my parents (second owner) 1975 Corvette last year in pristine like new condition, always taken care of and garage kept (65K original miles) After we added up all he spent on original purchase and repairs since 1983, I sold it for more then he paid entirely. (not including Hagerty Ins. and fuel of course) Vette's, if you had one you miss it, if you never did, you want one.

dooscoop32
Intermediate Driver

@Pepperalls

You wrote:  "57 Chev weren't the best seller (Ford was) and yet 57 Bel Air became a super-aspirational vehicle that arose from the masses rather than being elite to start with"

 

I always remember what a savvy car collector told me one time.  If it's hot when it's new, it'll be hot when it's old.  Part of the proof there is a used car lot in our area back in the late 50s and thru the mid-60s whose whole front row of cars was all '57 Chevrolets all the time.  All colors, body styles and series.  He bought every one he could get his hands on.  He did this, as I said, for around 10 years.  That should have told people something.  Later on, he did the same thing with '67-72 Chevrolet short-bed pickups.

camelot
Passenger

I think the new Challenger Super Stock will also be a future collector car.

mwmyers91
Detailer

Wow those base price's are really smacking the roof. Although 70K for a

pickup truck blows my mind as well.

CJSMustangs
New Driver

Incredible money for a pickup truck!  But they jump off the car dealer lots constantly.  Worse yet, price a decent used pickup truck!  Cheaper in the long run to buy a new truck.

RBHatton
New Driver

   With all the mandated electric vehicles coming by the mid-20's, I can't help but believe that big gas powered SUV's built in the early 2000's like Hummers, Ford Excursions, Chevy Suburbans, etc. will be in high demand around 2025.   If one uses the factor of doubling one's investment, I think a clean low mileage big SUV would be a no brainer.

Rider79
Instructor

The big SUV's will still be built then, if there is still a market.

Rich8
Intermediate Driver

I have the Cadillac CTS V love the car, interior is fine. I hate the more sophisticated, complicated, hard to learn German gadgets!  ...but weekends are made for the Corvair and it belongs on the list!  

Mikesdad1
Pit Crew

Scary thing here, is that your giving a Cadillac collector status, and we have been down this road before, starting with the 1976 Bi Centennial Eldorado, not very collectible figuring storage and associated costs of maintenance, say you paid 14,000 dollars for it, then stored it for 44 yrs, and it’s now worth 25,000 if it’s pristine, but the garage cost even 25.00 per month thru the 70s and 50 per month thru the 80s, and now it’s 250 per month. I think you lost money

wentwest
Intermediate Driver

Wow!  This is exactly right.  Buying a car today to double your money in 20 years is a terrible investment.  For those 20 years it pays you absolutely nothing, and it costs a lot.  If you love the car and get joy from looking at it in your storage place then great, but never forget you are paying for that joy.  We all pay for pleasure, but to call it an investment is just fooling yourself.  

JeepGuy69
Pit Crew

The Gladiator is plastic garbage that looks like it was designed by a half blind Sicilian. The Rubicon package is the only saving grace for the new Jeeps and they are north of $50k so no thanks! I will stick with my TJs and older

Juanchico
Passenger

As an Aussie I can see the lines of the last Holden Commodore in the Caddy. The VF Commodore is a fine looking car.

silverado
Intermediate Driver

I think the corvette because first year for mid engine and the mustang. The jeep, are you kidding me? they are now junk. The polester is too expensive. Trucks are way over priced so are motorcycles. I'm a GM guy so I go for the mid engine vette.

Rider79
Instructor

Polestar is a looker (that vestigial spoiler notwithstanding), but made in Communist China?  No deal.  We have enough things we HAVE to buy from there, but not cars - at least not yet.

 

The Jeep?  It will hold its value well, but assuming it continues to be built, it has little potential to be a true collectible.

 

Caddy?  Maybe...but only if more than a very select few ever know what it is about.

 

 

Ajakeski
Intermediate Driver

One off Mustang? probably. First gen mid-engine Corvette? more than likely. Jeep truck? Jeep people will buy anything with a seven slot grille. 

The chinese electric car? doubtful. Caddy V-6? Not a chance. 

Lists like this are subjective and based on opinions of the writer. I'm sure we all have our own list of what may be valuable in 20 years. 

Mikrobert
Passenger

My CT6 V must be really rare...it has a V8

PeppyLIbido
Passenger

I admire the optimism of this article and its assumption anyone might still be interested in IC vehicles in 20 years.