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Bryan
Hagerty Employee

2019 Jeep Wrangler rolls during IIHS small front overlap crash test

A video released by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) shows a current-generation Jeep Wrangler Unlimited rolling onto its side after a small front overlap crash test. The slow-motion video reveals the driver side front axle collapsing, shoving the wheel under the Jeep, before the off-roader tips to the side and eventually rolls onto its passenger side.

 

Read the full article on Hagerty.com:

https://www.hagerty.com/media/news/2019-jeep-wrangler-rolls-during-iihs-small-front-overlap-crash-te...

3 REPLIES 3
MPetrany
Pit Crew

Looking at that image, I guess you can have too much positive camber.

Pepperalls
Detailer

look up various on youtube... some do okay I suppose, generally anything low and small.

 

Minivans not so much. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZC8Ykl1esE

 

 

However, the test is hitting a solid stationary object at 45 mph... an unguarded bridge abutment would be the real-life comparable?

 

Does the Jeep flip if it hits a parked car this way (as per the test) or does the movement of the parked car mitigate enough force to not have a rollover?

 

Telephone pole could snap, car could deflect/wrap around it.

 

I'd be curious what % of small overlap actual accidents involve extremely stationary objects. I suppose what % of rear-endings qualify as "small overlap" might be pertinent too.

 

Wouldn't putting crumple things (i.e., bollards, barrels) and angles guards (i.e., Ontario uses cement dividers that are pretty hard to crash into to divide the highway vs. the post and wire systems I see other places) to keep everyone away from the big stationary objects on roadways make more sense? Considering many places are already doing this...

drm101
Intermediate Driver

If you own a Wrangler, this would still be OK. Not OK, means it's on the roof. They protect for both scenarios.