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Hagerty Employee

1963-1967 Corvette (C2) Buyers Guide

It’s an understatement to say the second-generation Chevrolet Corvette was a significant departure from the original “solid axle” Corvette.  Sporting a fully-independent suspension and a chassis blueprint benefiting from years of racing experience from GM engineer Zora Arkus-Duntov, and with designer Bill Mitchell’s all-new fastback coupe body (convertibles were available) reminiscent of the Stingray fish, the C2 set the standard in Corvette engineering for many years to come.

 

Read the full article on Hagerty.com:

https://www.hagerty.com/media/buying-and-selling/1963-1967-corvette-c2-buyers-guide/

25 REPLIES 25
Passenger

Are you sure the Fuel injection wasn’t available is 1965 ? I believe it was the last year for it. 

Pit Crew

I think the Rochester fuel injection was still available thru the ‘65 model year.

Passenger

They built 771 fuel injected 327 Corvettes for 1965 before replacing it with the 396.

Passenger

In fact, in the paragraph about the engines above, you list the 375 hp 327 which was the fuelie.

 

Community Manager

@RickT  @Hueco @auto-mark  thank you for your corrections (and for being nice about it), I have revised the article with your feedback.  I appreciate you making it a better guide for everyone!  

Passenger

Two small errors in the info on the '67 Corvette. On the exterior, the Corvette name was not removed from the rear deck as stated, and on the interior description, a change that was not mentioned was that all the control knobs were different from previous models.

Community Manager

Thank you for tell me about those errors, I have fixed them too. The more we fix the more I feel better about the quality of the work for future readers.
New Driver

Correction needed. The ‘66 C2 427/425 (L72) did not have tri power. It had a single Holley 4 barrel carburetor. 

Pit Crew

I own a very nice Rally Red Big Block 396 cu in (with a single Holley four BBL Carb) convertible with Factory Side Pipes and Knockoff wheels.  So I know the C2 line pretty well.  The first part of that production year (1965) the Big Block 396 cu in engine was not yet ready (it was on the option list, but not available until in the second half of the production year).  But you could still order the FI small block 327 engine if you wanted the most HP in early months.  After they sorted out the 396 Big Block issues, they dropped the "Fuelie" small block 327 engine.  The "Fuelie" gave a good HP kick, but they were hard to keep tuned, setup, and running right (In the days before the on-board computers we have today to manage the current FI engines, it was shall we say an "analog" setup).

 

 So then the 396 cu in Chevy Big Block led the way to the high horse power  Corvette top engine offering.  And BTW, there was a Chevy Corporate rule that limited ALL passenger cars to less than a 400 cu in engine up to the 1965 model year.  This was lifted for the 1966 model run and the 427 cu in engine was introduced.  The 427 cu in engine did not have a lot more HP (only 10 HP more, but yielding more torque).  And it was also simpler and cleaner engine to build for production.  When it comes to "one year only" features for Corvettes, the first year Big Block featuring the 396 cu in engine is fairly rare and unique (and to many people very desirable). 

 

Some people preferred the handling available from the 327 engine due the lower weight that engine put on the front wheels, but the Big Blocks (396, 427, and latter followed by the 454 in the C3 generation)  offer the most power that the Corvette line would see for many, many yer.  Just my two cents worth.